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Experientia

, Volume 34, Issue 9, pp 1178–1180 | Cite as

Organization of the mammalian red nucleus and its interconnections with the cerebellum

  • B. A. Flumerfelt
Article

Summary

The red nucleus in monkeys and rats consists of a magnocellular, rubrospinal portion which receives its cerebellar information from the nucleus interpositus, and a parvocellular, rubroolivary portion which receives cerebellar afferents from the nucleus lateralis. Distinct interpositorubrospinal and dentatorubroolivary projections are therefore common to these 2 species.

Keywords

Nucleus Lateralis Nucleus Interpositus Cerebellar Afferents 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Birkhäuser Verlag 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. A. Flumerfelt
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnatomyUniversity of Western OntarioLondonCanada

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