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AI & SOCIETY

, Volume 3, Issue 4, pp 315–322 | Cite as

Heuristics and pedagogy

  • Jay Weinroth
Article

Abstract

In its focus on heuristics as opposed to hierarchically structured general principles, expert systems technology suggests a pedagogic strategy with affinities to the approaches of some of the creative philosophers of East and West, and a challenge to the reliance on presentation of general principles found in academic tradition. A tutoring approach to classroom presentation may be seen to relate to the point that non-trivial general principles cannot be verbally expressed without substantial loss of meaning.

Keywords

Education Expert systems Heuristics Knowledge transfer Simulation Tutoring 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jay Weinroth
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Administrative Sciences, Graduate School of ManagementKent State UniversityKentUSA

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