Studies on the wood-borerStromatium fulvum Vill. (Col., Cerambycidae) infestingCasuarina glauca (Casuarinaceae)

II: Entomogenous fungi associated withStromatlum larvae
  • F. A. Hassan
  • T. A. Omran
  • O. A. Badran
  • E. A. Gaaboub
Article
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Abstract

The fungal genera associated with larvae ofStromatium fulvum were isolated externally, internally and also those from larval galleries and exit holes. They belonged to six genera:Penicillium, Trichoderma, Helminthosporium, Aspergillus, Rhizopus andChaetomium. Based on the antagonistic effect,Trichoderma andChaetomium were used in the mortality studies.

Isolation of fungi from inoculated dead larvae proved thatCheatomium spp. are non pathogenic. The genera ofTrichoderma spp.,Aspergillus spp. andPenicillium spp. were pathogenic and are recommended as biological control agents forStromatium fulvum larvae.

Keywords

Plant Physiology Plant Pathology Biological Control Control Agent Antagonistic Effect 

Zusammenfassung

Drei Gruppen entomogener Pilze wurden von denStromatium fulvum-Larven isoliert: außen am Körper, im Körperinneren sowie in den Larvengängen lebende. Sie gehören 6 Gattungen an:Penicillium, Trichoderma, Helminthosporium, Aspergillus, Rhizopus undChaetomium. Auf Grund ihrer antagonistischen Wirkung wurdenTrichoderma undChaetomium für Mortalitätsuntersuchungen verwendet.

Die Isolation von Pilzen von inokulierten toten Larven ergab, daßChaetomium nicht pathogen war. Dagegen erwiesen sichTrichoderma, Aspergillus undPenicillium als Pathogene und können daher als mögliche Mittel zur biologischen Bekämpfung des Bockkäfers betrachtet werden.

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Literature cited

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Copyright information

© Verlag Paul Parey 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. A. Hassan
    • 1
  • T. A. Omran
    • 1
  • O. A. Badran
    • 1
  • E. A. Gaaboub
    • 1
  1. 1.College of Agriculture, Dep. of Forestry and Wood Technol. and Plant ProtectionAlexandria UniversityEgypt

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