The survey of recent life experiences: A psychometric evaluation

Abstract

Hitherto, various critics have claimed that the most commonly used measure for daily hassles is confounded with psychological well-being in both content and format. In order to circumvent such contamination, the Survey of Recent Life Experiences (SRLE) was developed by Kohn and MacDonald (1992). In the present study, the SRLE was psychometrically evaluated within a general sample of the Dutch population. Confirmatory factor analysis showed that, with the exception of one item, the original six-factor structure was strongly replicated. For five of six factors, internal consistency reliabilities proved satisfactory. It is argued that the rather low internal consistency reliability of the sixth factor may be improved if additional items are subjoined. In addition, yielded relationships between the SRLE and other variables were in accordance with previous research. It is therefore argued that the results are in support of cross-cultural construct validity of the SRLE. Future use within other Western European societies is recommended.

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Majella de Jong, G., Timmerman, I.G.H. & Emmelkamp, P.M.G. The survey of recent life experiences: A psychometric evaluation. J Behav Med 19, 529–542 (1996). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01904902

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Key Words

  • hassles
  • stress
  • adults
  • assessment