Environmentalist

, Volume 14, Issue 1, pp 35–46 | Cite as

Environmental studies: Managing the disciplinary divide

  • R. D. Braddock
  • J. Fien
  • R. Rickson
Papers

Summary

Environmental studies has developed as an academic activity over the last 25 years. The area usually calls into play interdisciplinarity and the exploration of values. It also calls for inputs across a range of disparate sciences and humanities. Central to binding together these inputs are needs for commitment and communication between the cultures and philosophies involved.

Older and more traditional university cultures are not properly structured to permit the level of communication needed. Several models of environmental activities, and particularly their management, are described, together with their strengths and weaknesses. The lifeboat model as used at Griffith University is also described. This model indicates how the levels of communication can be enhanced by both major structural characteristics, as well as by more minor decisions like the allocation of offices.

Keywords

Structural Characteristic Environmental Management Nature Conservation Environmental Study Environmental Activity 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Dunlap, R.E., Gallup, G.H. Jr. and Gallup, A.M. 1992. The Health of the Planet Survey: A Preliminary Report on Attitudes toward the Environment and Economic Growth Measured by Surveys of Citizens in 22 Nations to Date. Paper read at the Annual Meetings of the International Association for Impact Assessment, Washington DC, 19–22 August.Google Scholar
  2. Merton, R.K. 1964.Social Theory and Social Structure. The Free Press of Glencoe, Collier-Macmillan Ltd., London.Google Scholar
  3. Milbrath, L.W. 1989.Envisioning a Sustainable Society. State University of New York Press, Albany, USA.Google Scholar
  4. Rickson, R.E. and Rickson, S.T. 1982. Problems and prospects of cross disciplinary research.The Rural Sociologist,2, 95–104.Google Scholar
  5. Saxberg, B.O., Newell, W.T. and Marr, B.W. 1986. Interdisciplinary research—a dilemma for university central administration. In: Chubin, D.E., Porter, A.L., Rossini, F.A. and Connolly, T. (eds),Interdisciplinary Analysis and Research, pp. 193–203. Lamond Publishers, Mt Airy. Maryland, USA.Google Scholar
  6. UNESCO (1990), Environmental Education at a General Level in Tertiary Institutions of the Pacific Subregion.Proceedings of a Seminar and Workshops. Graduate School of the Environment, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Science and Technology Letters 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. D. Braddock
    • 1
  • J. Fien
    • 1
  • R. Rickson
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of Environmental SciencesGriffith UniversityNathanAustralia

Personalised recommendations