The Visual Computer

, Volume 4, Issue 1, pp 40–48 | Cite as

The Mona Lisa identification: Evidence from a computer analysis

  • Lillian F. Feldmann Schwartz
Article

Abstract

A recent computer-aided study identified the model immortalized in Leonardo da Vinci's celebratedMona Lisa to be none other than the artist himself. A follow-up investigation empolying similar techniques identifies the subject of asecond “Hidden”Mona Lisa by the same artist. Analysis of photographic and x-ray images indicates that Leonardo first created a sketch of Isabella, Duchess of Aragon, which he later painted over with theMona Lisa, using himself as the model.

Key words

Computer graphics Picture processing Art history Art Leonardo da Vinci 

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References and notes

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lillian F. Feldmann Schwartz
    • 1
  1. 1.AT & T Bell LaboratoriesMurray HillUSA

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