AI & SOCIETY

, Volume 5, Issue 1, pp 34–60 | Cite as

Double-level languages and co-operative working

  • Mike Robinson
Article

Abstract

Four criteria are discussed as important conditions of successful applications in Computer Supported Co-operative Work (CSCW). They are equality, mutual influence, new competence, and double-level language. The criteria originate in the experience of the International Co-operative Movement. They are examined and illustrated withreference to eight contemporary CSCW applications: meeting scheduling and support; bargaining; co-authoring; co-ordination; planning; design support and collaborative design.

Keywords

CSCW Competence Co-operative Criteria Double-level-language Equality 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mike Robinson
    • 1
  1. 1.OOC ProgramUniversity of AmsterdamAmsterdamThe Netherlands

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