Advertisement

Foundations of Physics

, Volume 17, Issue 11, pp 1051–1112 | Cite as

Erwin Schrödinger and the rise of wave mechanics. I. Schrödinger's scientific work before the creation of wave mechanics

  • Jagdish Mehra
Part I. Invited Papers Commemorating the Centenary of the Birth of Erwin Schrödinged

Abstract

This article is in three parts. Part I gives an account of Erwin Schrödinger's growing up and studies in Vienna, his scientific work—first in Vienna from 1911 to 1920, then in Zurich from 1920 to 1925—on the dielectric properties of matter, atmospheric electricity and radioactivity, general relativity, color theory and physiological optics, and on kinetic theory and statistical mechanics. Part II deals with the creation of the theory of wave mechanics by Schrödinger in Zurich during the early months of 1926; he laid the foundations of this theory in his first two communications toAnnalen der Physik. Part III deals with the early applications of wave mechanics to atomic problems—including the demonstration of equivalence of wave mechanics with the quantum mechanics of Born, Heisenberg, and Jordan, and that of Dirac—by Schrödinger himself and others. The new theory was immediately accepted by the scientific community.

Keywords

Color General Relativity Quantum Mechanic Dielectric Property Scientific Community 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Erwin Schrödinger, inLes Prix Nobel en 1933, Imprimérie Royale P. A. Norstedt & Soener, Stockholm: (1935), pp. 86–88; reprinted inGesammelte Abhandlungen/Collected Papers 4 (1984), pp. 361–363.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    AHQP Interview with Mrs. Annemarie Schrödinger, April 5, 1963, pp. 1–2.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    E. Schrödinger, “Lebenslauf,” an autobiographical note by Schrödinger, dated July 2, 1938, AHQP Microfilm No. 39, Section 1.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    E. Schrödinger,Gedichte, Kupper, Bad Godesberg (1949).Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    E. Schrödinger,Nature and the Greeks, University Press, Cambridge (1954) (elaborated Shearman Lectures, delivered at University College, London, on May 24, 26, 28, and 31, 1948).Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    For a list of these courses, see J. Mehra and H. Rechenberg:The Historical Development of Quantum Theory, Volume 5, Part 1, Springer-Verlag, New York (1987), pp. 69–70.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Paul Ehrenfest moved with his Russian-born wife Tatyana to Göttingen and later to St. Petersburg. Lise Meitner served, after receiving her doctorate, first as a teacher in a girls' secondary school in Vienna, then went on to Berlin to pursue a scientific career there.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    E. Schrödinger, Antrittsrede,Sitz. Ber. Preuss. Akad. Wiss. (Berlin), pp. C–CII (presented at the meeting of July 4, 1929); reprinted inCollected Papers 4 (1984), pp. 303–305.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    See the announcement inPhys. Z. 9, 696 (1908), and10, 294 (1909). Schrödinger kept two notebooks on Przibram's lectures (AHQP Microfilm No. 39, Section 1).Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    F. Hasenöhrl, “Über die Anwendbarkeit der Hamiltonischen partiellen Differentialgleichung in der Dynamik Kontinuierlich verbreiteter Massen,”Festschrift Ludwig Boltzmann, J. A. Barth, Leipzig (1904), pp. 642–646.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    E. Schrödinger, Über die Leitung der Elektrizität auf der Oberfläsche von Islatoren an feuchter Luft,Sitz. Ber. Akad. Wiss. (Wien) 119, 1215–1222 (1910); reprinted inCollected Papers 2 (1984), pp. 3–9.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    E. Schrödinger, Zur kinetischen Theorie des Magnetismus (Einfluß der Leitungselektronen),Sitz. Ber. Akad. Wiss. (Wien) 121, 1305–1328 (1912); reprinted inCollected Papers 1 (1934), pp. 3–26.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Nearly fifteen years later Wolfgang Pauli, Schrödinger's younger Viennese countryman, would start the consistent explanation of the phenomena with his paper on the paramagnetism of metal electrons, W. Pauli, Über Gasentartung und Paramagnetismus,Z. Phys. 41, 81–102 (1926); reprinted inCollected Scientific Papers 2 (1964), pp. 284–305.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    E. Schrödinger, Studien über Kinetik der Dielektrika, den Schmelzpunkt, Pyro- und Piezoelektrizität,Sitz. Ber. Akad. Wiss. (Wien) 121, 1937–1972 (1912); reprinted inCollected Papers 1 (1984), pp. 63–78.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    E. Schrödinger, pp. 1937–1938.Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Ludwig Boltzmann displayed in detail van der Waals' theory of gaseous and fluid states in the second volume of hisVorlesungen über Gastheorie. He did not address there the problem of the solid state at all, nor did he publish anything on it later (or earlier). However, in the BoltzmannNachlaß a manuscript, entitled “Versuche einer Theorie des festen Körpers vom Standpunkte der mechanischen Wärmetheorie” (“Attempts at a Theory of Solids from the Point of View of the Mechanical Theory of Heat”) has been found. In this manuscript Boltzmann dealt with the law of Pierre Louis Dulong and Alexis Thérèse Petit for the specific heats of solids; he tried to derive it on the basis of the assumption that the solids consist of molecules performing thermal vibrations about their average positions. (see G. Fasol, Comments on some manuscripts by Ludwig Boltzmann, inLudwig Boltzmann Gesamtausgabe, Volume 8, R. Sexl and J. Blackmore, eds., Akademische Druck- und Verlagsanstalt, Graz, and Friedr. Vieweg & Sohn, Braunschwelg-Wiesbaden (1982), pp. 87–95.)Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    P. Debye, Einige Resultate kinetischen Theorie der Isolatoren,Phys. Z. 13, 97–100 (1912); Nachtrag zur Notiz über eine kinetische Theorie der Isolatoren,Phys. Z. 13, 295 (1912).Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Experiments—Debye quoted, e.g., an investigation by the young Hasenöhrl (Über den Temperaturcoëfficienten der Dielektricitätsconstante in Flüssigkeiten und die Mosotti-Clausius'sche Formel,Sit. Ber. Akad. Wiss. (Wien) 105, 460–476 (1906), doctoral dissertation, presented at the meeting of November 9, 1896)—had demanded such a temperature-dependent term.Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    P. Debye, p. 99.Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    E. Schrödinger, pp. 1938–1939.Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    P. Weiss, L'hypothèse du champ moléculaire et la propriété ferromagnétique,J. Phys. (Paris) (4 6, 661–690 (1907).Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    E. Schrödinger, p. 1943.Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    E. Grüneisen, Zur Theorie einatomiger fester Körper,Phys. Z. 12, 1023–1028 (1911) (presented at the 83rdNaturforscherversammlung in Karlsruhe, September 24–30, 1911).Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    P. Debye, Les particularités des chaleurs spécifiques à basse temperature,Arch. Sci. Phys. Nat. (Genève) 33, 256–258 (1912); Zur Theorie der specifischen Wärmen,Ann. Phys. (4) 39, 789–838 (1912); Interferenz von Röntgenstrahlen und Wärmebergsegung,Ann. Phys. (4) 43, 49–95 (1914); Zustandsgleichung und Quantenhypothese mit einem Anhang über Wärmeleitung, inVorträge über die kinetische Theorie der Maaerie und der Elektrizität (Planck, Debye, Nernst, Smoluchowski, Sommerfeld, Lorentz, etc., 1914), pp. 17–60.Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    M. Born, Über die Methode der Eigenschwingungen in der Theorie der spezifischen Wärme,Phys. Z. 15, 185–191 (1914). M. Born and T. von Kármán: Über Schwingungen in Raumgittern,Phys. Z. 13, 297–309 (1912); Zur Theorie der spezifischen Wärme,Phys. Z. 14, 15–19 (1913); Über die Verteilung der Eigenschwingungen von Punktgittern,Phys. Z. 14, 65–71 (1913).Google Scholar
  26. 26.
    E. Schrödinger, Dielktrizität, inHandbuch der Elektrizität und des Magnetismus (L. Graetz, ed.), Volume I, J. A. Barth, Leipzig (1918), pp. 157–231; reprinted inCollected Papers 2 (1984), pp. 216–276.Google Scholar
  27. 27.
    E. Schrödinger, Notiz uber die Theorie der anomalen elektrischen Dispersion,Verh. Deutsch. Phys. Ges. (2 15, 1167–1172 (1913); reprinted inCollected Papers 1 (1984), pp. 79–123.Google Scholar
  28. 28.
    Egon von Schweidler, Studien über die Anomalien im Verhalten der Dielektrika,Sitz. Ber. Akad. Wiss. (Wien) 116, 1019–1080 (1907).Google Scholar
  29. 29.
    P. Debye, Zur Theorie der anomalen Dispersion im Gebiete der langwelligen elektrischen Strahlung,Verh. Deutsch. Phys. Ges. (2 15, 777–793 (1913).Google Scholar
  30. 30.
    P. Drude, Zur Theorie der anomalen electrischen Dispersion,Ann. Phys. (3 64, 131–158 (1898).Google Scholar
  31. 31.
    Schrödinger was fairly convinced that the description of the anomalous dispersion was more complicated than Debye had assumed; he suggested, for example, considering besides the permanent dipoles one type of aperiodically damped electrons, as Paul Drude had assumed—this would provide more constants to fit into experimental data than Debye's theory; he also thought that “a simple, generally valid, electric dispersion formula was excluded from the very beginning” (E. Schrödinger, p. 1170).Google Scholar
  32. 32.
    E. von Schweidler, Atmosphärische Elektrizität,Encyckl. d. math. Wiss. VI/1, 1918, pp. 235–265, p. 236.Google Scholar
  33. 33.
    E. Schrödinger, Über die Höhenverteilung der durchdringenden atmosphärischen Strahlung (Theorie),Sitz. Ber. Akad. Wiss. (Wien) 121, 2391–2406 (1912).Google Scholar
  34. 34.
    E. Schrödinger,. p. 2391.Google Scholar
  35. 35.
    A. S. Eve, On the Ionization of the Atmosphere due to Radioactive Matter,Philos. Mag. (6 21, 26–40 (1911); L. V. King, Absorption Problems in Radioactivity,Philos. Mag. (6) 23, 242–250 (1912).Google Scholar
  36. 36.
    E. Schrödinger,. p. 2392.Google Scholar
  37. 37.
    E. Schrödinger, Radium-A-Gehalt der Atmosphäre in Seeham 1913,Sitz. Ber. Akad. Wiss. (Wien) 122, 2023–2067, 2023 (1913).Google Scholar
  38. 38.
    V. F. Hess, Absolutbestimmungen des Gehaltes der Atmosphäre an Radiuminduktion.Sitz. Ber. Akad. Wiss. (Wien) 119, 145–195 (1910).Google Scholar
  39. 39.
    E. Schrödinger, p. 2048.Google Scholar
  40. 40.
    A. Haas, Über die elektrodynamische Bedeutung des Planck'schen Strahlungsgesetzes und Über eine neue Bestimmung des Elektrischen Elementarquantums und der Dimensionen des Wasserstoffatoms,Sitz. Ber. Akad. Wiss. (Wien) 119, 119–144 (1910).Google Scholar
  41. 41.
    H. A. Lorentz, Alte und neue Fragen der Physik,Phys. Z. 11, 1234–1257 (1910) (Wolfskehl lectures, delivered October 24–29, 1910 at Göttingen, elaborated by M. Born).Google Scholar
  42. 42.
    A. Schidlof, Zur Aufklärung der universellen elektrodynamischen Bedeutung der Planckschen Strahlungskonstanten h,Ann. Phys. (4)35, 90–100 (1911).Google Scholar
  43. 43.
    F. Hasenöhri, Über die Grundlagen der mechanischen Theorie der Wärme,Phys. Z. 12, 931–935 (1911) (presented on September 25, 1911 at the 83rdNaturforscherversammlung in Karlsruke).Google Scholar
  44. 44.
    K. Herzfeld, Über din Atommodell, das die Balmer'sche Wasserstoffserie aussendet,Sitz. Ber. Akad. Wiss. (Wien) 121, 593–601 (1912).Google Scholar
  45. 45.
    K. Herzfeld, Der Zeeman effekt in den Quantentheorien der Serierspektren,Phys. Z. 15, 193–198 (1914).Google Scholar
  46. 46.
    N. Bohr, On the Constitution of Atoms and Molecules,Philos. Mag. (6)26, 1–25 (1913); reprinted inCollected Works 2 (1981), pp. 161–185.Google Scholar
  47. 47.
    H. Thirring, Zur Theorie der Raumgitterschwingungen und der spezifischen Wärme fester Körper,Phys. Z. 14, 867–873 (1913).Google Scholar
  48. 48.
    E. Madelung, Molekulare Eigenschwingungen,Nachr. Ges. Wiss. Göttingen, pp. 100–106 (1909); Molekulare Eigenschwingungen. Nachtrag zu meiner fruheren Mitteilung,Nachr. Ges. Wiss. Göttingen, pp. 43–58 (1910); Molekulare Eigenschwingungen,Phys. Z. 11, 898–905 (1910).Google Scholar
  49. 49.
    A. Einstein, Die Plancksche Theorie der Strahlung und die Theorie der spezifischen Wärme,Ann. Phys. (4)22, 180–190 (1906).Google Scholar
  50. 50.
    Debye assumed, in particular, that the sum of all frequency modes up tov m should be equal to the number of degrees of freedom in the crystal, i.e., 6N.Google Scholar
  51. 51.
    See M. Born and T. von Kármán, 1912, p. 308, Eq. (50).Google Scholar
  52. 52.
    H. Thirring, p. 868.Google Scholar
  53. 53.
    H. Thirring, Raumgitterschwingungen und spezifischen Wärme fester Körper. I,Phys. Z. 14, 127–133 (1914); II,Phys. Z. 15, 180–185.Google Scholar
  54. 54.
    H. Thirring, Erwin Schrödinger zum 60. Geburtstag,Acta Phys. Austriaca 1, 105–109 (1947).Google Scholar
  55. 55.
    W. Friedrich, P. Knipping, and M. Laue, Interferenz-Erscheinungen bei Röntgenstrahlen,Sitz. Ber. Akad. Wiss. (Munchen), pp. 303–322 (1912).Google Scholar
  56. 56.
    M. von Laue and F. Tank, Die Gehalt der Interferenzpunkte bei den Röntgenstrahl-interferenzen,Ann. Phys. (4)41, 1003–1011 (1913).Google Scholar
  57. 57.
    M. von Laue and F. Tank, p. 1010.Google Scholar
  58. 58.
    M. von Laue, Über den Temperatureinfluß bei den Interferenzerscheinungen an Röntgenstrahlen,Ann. Phys. (4)42, 1561–1571 (1913).Google Scholar
  59. 59.
    P. Debye, Interferenz von Röntgenstrahlen und Wärmebewegung,Ann. Phys. (4)43, 59–95 (1914).Google Scholar
  60. 60.
    E. Schrödinger, Über die Schärfe der mit Röntgenstrahlen erzeugten Interferenzbilder,Phys. Z. 15, 79–86 (1914); reprinted inCollected Papers 2 (1984), pp. 17–24.Google Scholar
  61. 61.
    E. Schrödinger, p. 79.Google Scholar
  62. 62.
    E. Schrödinger, p. 85.Google Scholar
  63. 63.
    E. Schrödinger, p. 86.Google Scholar
  64. 64.
    E. Schrödinger, Zur Theorie des Debyeeffekts,Phys. Z. 15, 497–503 (1914); reprinted inCollected Papers 2 (1984), pp. 17–24.Google Scholar
  65. 65.
    E. Schrödinger, p. 498.Google Scholar
  66. 66.
    E. Schrödinger, p. 500.Google Scholar
  67. 67.
    M. von Laue and J. S. van der Lingen, Experimentelle Untersuchungen über Debyeeffekt,Phys. Z. 15, 75–77 (1914).Google Scholar
  68. 68.
    E. Schrödinger, Zur Dynamik elastisch gekoppelter Punktsysteme,Ann. Phys. (4)44, 916–934 (1914); reprinted inCollected Papers 1 (1984), pp. 124–142.Google Scholar
  69. 69.
    L. Boltzmann,Populäre Schriften, J. A. Barth, Leipzig (1905).Google Scholar
  70. 70.
    E. Schrödinger, pp. 916–917.Google Scholar
  71. 71.
    E. Schrödinger, p. 917.Google Scholar
  72. 72.
    E. Schrödinger, p. 918.Google Scholar
  73. 73.
    E. Schrödinger, p. 921.Google Scholar
  74. 74.
    E. Schrödinger, Zur Dynamik der elastischen Punktreihe,Sitz. Ber. Akad. Wiss. (Wien)123, 1679–1696 (1914); reprinted inCollected Papers 1 (1984), pp. 143–160.Google Scholar
  75. 75.
    A. Einstein, Zum gegenwartigen Stand des Gravitations problems,Phys. Z. 14, 1249–1266 (1913); presented on September 23, 1913 at the 85thNaturforscherversammlung in Vienna.Google Scholar
  76. 76.
    A. Einstein and M. Grossmann, Entwurf einer verallgemeinerten Relativitätstheorie und ein Theorie der Gravitation. I. Physikalischer Teil von A. Einstein. II. Mathematischer Teil von M. Grossmann,Z. Math. Phys. 62, 225–261 (1913).Google Scholar
  77. 77.
    SeePhys. Z. 15, 486 (1914).Google Scholar
  78. 78.
    SeePhys. Z. 15, 863 (1914).Google Scholar
  79. 79.
    F. K. W. Kohlrausch and E. Schrödinger, Über die weiche (ß) Sekundärstrahlung von γ-Strahlen,Sitz. Ber. Akad. Wiss. (Wien) 123, 1319–1367 (1914), reprinted inCollected Papers 2 (1984), pp. 32–80.Google Scholar
  80. 80.
    E. Schrödinger, p. 87.Google Scholar
  81. 81.
    E. Schrödinger, Notiz über den Kapillardruck in Gasblasen,Ann. Phys. (4)46, 413–418 (1915); reprinted inCollected Papers 1 (1984), pp. 167–173.Google Scholar
  82. 82.
    E. Schrödinger, Ref. 3.Google Scholar
  83. 83.
    E. Schrödinger, Notes of Lectures, AHQP Microfilm No. 39, Section 2.Google Scholar
  84. 84.
    E. Schrödinger, Zur Akustik der Atmosphäre,Phys. Z. 18, 445–452; (1917) reprinted inCollected Papers 1 (1984), pp. 3–11.Google Scholar
  85. 85.
    E. Schrödinger, Die Energiekomponenten des Gravitationsfeldes,Phys. Z. 19, 4–7 (1918); reprinted inCollected Papers 2 (1984), pp. 156–159.Google Scholar
  86. 86.
    E. Schrödinger, Über ein Lösungssystem der allgemein kovarianten Gravitationsgleichungen,Phys. Z. 19, 20–22 (1918); reprinted inCollected Papers 2 (1984), pp. 160–162.Google Scholar
  87. 87.
    E. Schrödinger, Die Ergebnisse der neueren Forschung über Atom-und Molekularwärmen,Naturwissenschaften 5, 537–543, 561–567 (1917); reprinted inCollected Papers 1 (1984) pp. 174–187.Google Scholar
  88. 88.
    E. Schrödinger, Der Energieinhalt der Festkörper im Lichte der neueren Forschung,Phys. Z. 20, 420–428, 450–455, 474–480, 497–503, 523–526 (1919); reprinted inCollected Papers 1 (1984), pp. 216–276.Google Scholar
  89. 89.
    E. Schrödinger, Notebook on “Schwankungsopaleszenz”; this notebook is undated and has been filed on AHQP Microfilm No. 39, Section 4. However, Schrödinger quoted in it a paper of Leonard Ornstein and Frits Zernike in theProceedings of the Royal Academy of Sciences, Amsterdam, which appeared in the second half of 1914. Therefore, one might assume that Schrödinger composed his notes on fluctuation opalescence in late 1914, probably on a furlough from military service (perhaps around Christmas 1914).Google Scholar
  90. 90.
    The two notebooks on “Besprechung der letzten Arbeiten Smoluchowskis,” together containing 51 pages, have been filed on AHQP Microfilm No. 39, Section 5. We do not know whether Schrödinger intended to publish his notes on Smoluchowski, or at least part of them; or whether he used them in lectures.Google Scholar
  91. 91.
    E. Schrödinger, Zur Theorie der Fall- und Steigversuche an Teilchen mit Brownscher Bewegung,Phys. Z. 16, 289–295 (1915); reprinted inCollected Papers 1 (1984), pp. 166–173.Google Scholar
  92. 92.
    E. Schrödinger, Notiz über die Ordnung der Zufausreihen,Phys. Z. 19, 218–220 (1918); reprinted inCollected Papers 1 (1984), pp. 214–215.Google Scholar
  93. 93.
    E. Schrödinger, Über ein in der experimentellen Radiumforschung auftretendes Problem der statistischen Dynamik,Sitz. Ber. Akad. Wiss. (Wien)127, 237–262 (1918); reprinted inCollected Papers 1 (1984), pp. 188–213.Google Scholar
  94. 94.
    E. Schrödinger, Wahrscheinlichkeitstheoretische Studien, betreffend Schweidler'sche Schwankungen, besonders die Theorie der Meßanordnung,Sitz. Ber. Akad. Wiss. (Wien)128, 177–273 (1919); reprinted inCollected Papers 1 (1984), pp. 216–276.Google Scholar
  95. 95.
    The notebooks have been filed on AHQP Microfilm No. 39, Section 3. We conclude that Schrödinger did not start writing the notes on tensor-analytical mechanics before the middle of 1917, probably even later. For the reasons for this conclusion, see Ref. 6, Part 1, p. 220, footnote 454.Google Scholar
  96. 96.
    H. Hertz,Die Principien der Mechanik (Gesammelte Werke, Volume3, J. A. Barth, Leipzig (1984).Google Scholar
  97. 97.
    F. Paulus, Ergänzungen und Beispiele zur Mechanik von Hertz,Sitz. Ber. Akad. Wiss. (Wien) 125, 835–882 (1916).Google Scholar
  98. 98.
    E. Schrödinger, Manuscript on “Hertz'sche Mechanik und Einstein'sche Gravitationstheorie”: Filed on AHQP Microfilm No. 39, Section 3. For dating, see Ref. 6, Part 1, p. 221, footnote 457.Google Scholar
  99. 99.
    E. Schrödinger, Über Kohärenz in weitgeöffneten Bündeln,Ann. Phys. (4 61, 69–86, 69 (1920); reprinted inCollected Papers 2 (1984), pp. 163–180.Google Scholar
  100. 100.
    E. Schrödinger, Theorie der Pigmente von größter Leuchtkraft,Ann. Phys. (4 62, 603–622 (1920); reprinted inCollected Papers 4 (1984), pp. 13–32.Google Scholar
  101. 101.
    E. Schrödinger, Versuch einer modellmäßigen Deutung des Terms der scharfen Nebenserien,Z. Phys. 4, 347–354 (1921); reprinted inCollected Papers 3 (1984), pp. 3–10.Google Scholar
  102. 102.
    E. Fues, Vergleich zwischen den Funkenspektren der Erdalkalien und den Bogenspektren der Alkalien,Ann. Phys. (4 63, 1–27 (1920).Google Scholar
  103. 103.
    E. Schrödinger, p. 347.Google Scholar
  104. 104.
    E. Schrödinger, p. 354.Google Scholar
  105. 105.
    N. Bohr to E. Schrödinger, June 15, 1921; N. Bohr, lecture presented on 18 October 1921 before the Physical and Chemical Society of Copenhagen (Bohr,Collected Works 4 (1977), pp. 185–256); N. Bohr, 5th Wolfskehl Lecture at Göttingen on June 20, 1922 (Bohr, 1977, p. 494).Google Scholar
  106. 106.
    E. Schrödinger, Uber eine bemerkenswerte Eigenschaft der Quantenbahnen eines einzelnen Elektrons,Z. Phys. 12, 13–23 (1922); reprinted inCollected Papers 1 (1984), pp. 319–323.Google Scholar
  107. 107.
    F. London to E. Schrödinger, December 1926.Google Scholar
  108. 108.
    W. Pauli, Relativitatstheorie,Encykl. Math. Wiss. V/2, 539–775 (1926); reprinted inCollected Scientific Papers 1 (1984), pp. 1–237.Google Scholar
  109. 109.
    E. Schrödinger to W. Pauli, November 7, 1921.Google Scholar
  110. 110.
    H. Weyl, Gravitation und Elektrizität,Sitz. Ber. Preuss. Akad. Wiss. (Berlin), pp. 466–480 (1918); reprinted inGesammelte Abhandlungen (1968), pp. 29–42.Google Scholar
  111. 111.
    H. Weyl,Raum-Zeit-Materie: Vorlesungen über allgemeine Relativitatstheorie, Springer, Berlin (1918): English translation (by H. L. Brose):Space, Time, Matter, Dover, New York (1952).Google Scholar
  112. 112.
    H. Weyl, English translation, p. 303.Google Scholar
  113. 113.
    E. Schrödinger, p. 14.Google Scholar
  114. 114.
    E. Schrödinger, p. 22.Google Scholar
  115. 115.
    E. Schrödinger, p. 23.Google Scholar
  116. 116.
    A. Smekal,Phys. Ber. 4, No. 18, 1082–1083 (1922).Google Scholar
  117. 117.
    W. Wilson, The Quantum Theory and Electromagnetic Phenomena,Proc. R. Soc. London A102, 478–483 (1923).Google Scholar
  118. 118.
    For the modern significance of Schrödinger's introduction of √-1 in Eq. (25), see C. N. Yang: Square Root of Minus One, Complex Phases and Erwin Schrödinger, inSchrödinger: Centenary of a Polymath, C. W. Kilmister (Ed.), Cambridge University Press, Cambridge (1987).Google Scholar
  119. 119.
    K. Försterling, Bohrsches Atommodell und Relativitätstheorie,Z. Phys. 3, 404–407 (1920).Google Scholar
  120. 120.
    K. Försterling, p. 404.Google Scholar
  121. 121.
    W. Pauli,Phys. Ber. 2, No. 9, May 1, 1921, p. 489.Google Scholar
  122. 122.
    E. Schrödinger, Dopplerprinzip und Bohrsche Frequenzbedingung,Phys. Z. 23, 301–303 (1922); reprinted inCollected Papers 3 (1984), pp. 11–13.Google Scholar
  123. 123.
    N. Bohr, Über die Anwendung der Quantentheorie auf den Atombau. I. Grundpostulate der Quantentheorie,Z. Phys. 13, 117–165 (1923); reprinted inCollected Works 3 (1926), pp. 457–500.Google Scholar
  124. 124.
    E. Schrödinger to W. Pauli, November 8, 1922.Google Scholar
  125. 125.
    E. Schrödinger, Was ist ein Naturgesetz?,Naturwissenschaften 17, 9–11 (1929) (inaugural address delivered on December 9, 1922 at the University of Zurich); reprinted inCollected Papers 4 (1984), pp. 295–297.Google Scholar
  126. 126.
    N. Bohr, H. Kramers, and J. C. Slater, The Quantum Theory of Radiation,Philos. Mag. (6 47, 785–802 (1924).Google Scholar
  127. 127.
    E. Schrödinger to N. Bohr, May 24, 1924.Google Scholar
  128. 128.
    E. Schrödinger, Bohrs neue Strahlungs hypothese und der Energiesatz,Naturwissenschaften 12, 720–724 (1924); reprinted inCollected Papers 3 (1984), pp. 26–30.Google Scholar
  129. 129.
    E. Schrödinger, p. 720.Google Scholar
  130. 130.
    A. Sommerfeld,Atombau und Spektrallinien, 4th edn., Friedr. Vieweg & Sohn, Braunschweig (1924).Google Scholar
  131. 131.
    E. Schrödinger to A. Sommerfeld, November 19, 1924; E. Schrödinger, Über die Rotationswärme des Wasserstoffs,Z. Phys. 30, 341–349, 342 (1924); reprinted inCollected Papers 1 (1984), pp. 332–380.Google Scholar
  132. 132.
    E. Schrödinger, Die wasserstoffähnlichen Spektren vom Standpunkte der Polarisierbarkeit des Atomrumpfes,Ann. Phys. (4 77, 43–70 (1925); reprinted inCollected Papers 3 (1984), pp. 31–58.Google Scholar
  133. 133.
    E. Schrödinger, p. 45.Google Scholar
  134. 134.
    D. R. Hartree, Some Relations between the Optical Spectra of Different Atoms of the Same Electron Structure. I. Lithium-like and Sodium-like Atoms,Proc. R. Soc. London A 106, 552–580 (1924).Google Scholar
  135. 135.
    E. Schrödinger to A. Sommerfeld, July 21, 1925.Google Scholar
  136. 136.
    W. Ostwald, Neuere Forschungen zur Farbenlehre,Phys. Z. 17, 322–332, 352–364 (1916); Neuere Fortschritte der Farbenlehre. II,Phys. Z. 22, 88–95, 125–128 (1921).Google Scholar
  137. 137.
    F. K. W. Kohlrausch, Beiträge zur Fabenlehre. I. Farbton und Sättigung der Pigmentfarben,Phys. Z. 21, 396–403 (1920); Beiträge zur Farbenlehre. II. Die Helligkeit der Pigmentfarben,Phys. Z. 21, 423–426 (1920); Berträge zur Farbenlahre. III. Bemerkungen zur Oswaldschen Theorie der Pigmentfarben,Phys. Z. 21, 473–477 (1920).Google Scholar
  138. 138.
    F. K. W. Kohlrausch, Bemerkungen zur Ostwaldschen sogennanten Farbentheorie,Phys. Z. 22, 402–403 (1921).Google Scholar
  139. 139.
    E. Schrödinger,Google Scholar
  140. 140.
    H. von Helmholtz, Versuch einer erweiterten Anwendung des Fechner'schen Gesetzes im Farbensystemen,Wissenschaftliche Abhandlungen 3, 407–437 (1895); Versuch, das psychophysische Gesetz auf die Farbenunterschiede trichromatischer Augen anzuwenden,Wissenschaftliche Abhandlungen 3, 438–459 (1895); Kürzeste Linien im Farbensystem,Wissenschaftliche Abhandlungen 3, 460–475 (1895).Google Scholar
  141. 141.
    H. von Helmholtz, Die Störung der Wahrnehmung kleinster Helligkeitsunterschiede durch das Eigenlicht der Netzhaut,Wissenschaftliche Abhandlungen 3, 392–406 (1895).Google Scholar
  142. 142.
    E. Schrödinger, Grundlinien einer Theorie der Farbenmetrik im Tagessehen, (I. Mitteilung),Ann. Phys. (4 63, 397–426 (1920); reprinted inCollected Papers 4 (1984), pp. 33–62.Google Scholar
  143. 143.
    E. Schrödinger, Grundlinien einer Theorie der Farbenmetrik im Tagessehen. (III. Mitteilung),Ann. Phys. (4 63, 427–456 (1920); reprinted inCollected Papers 4 (1984), pp. 63–92.Google Scholar
  144. 144.
    E. Schrödinger, Grundlinien einer Theorie der Farbenmetrik im Tagessehen. (III. Mitteilung). Der Farbenmetrik II. Teil Höhere Farbenmetrik (eigentliche Metrik der Farbe),Ann. Phys. (4 63, 481–520 (1920); reprinted inCollected Papers 4 (1984), pp. 93–132.Google Scholar
  145. 145.
    E. Schrödinger, Farbenmetrik,Z. Phys. 1, 459–466 (1920); reprinted inCollected Papers 4 (1984), pp. 133–140.Google Scholar
  146. 146.
    E. Schrödinger, p. 482.Google Scholar
  147. 147.
    E. Schrödinger, p. 484.Google Scholar
  148. 148.
    E. Schrödinger, p. 485.Google Scholar
  149. 149.
    See, e.g., E. Schrödinger to W. Wien, May 28, 1925.Google Scholar
  150. 150.
    E. Schrödinger, Die Gesichtsemfindungen, inMüller-Pouillets Lehrbuch der Physik, 11th edn., Volume 2, 1926, pp. 456–560; reprinted inCollected Papers 4 (1984), pp. 183–287.Google Scholar
  151. 151.
    E. Schrödinger, Über den Ursprung der Empfindlichkeitskurven des Auges,Naturwissenschaften 12, 925–929 (1924); reprinted inCollected Papers 3 (1984), pp. 148–152.Google Scholar
  152. 152.
    E. Schrödinger, Über die subjektiven Sternfarben und die Qualität der Dämmerungsempfindung,Naturwissenschaften 13, 373–376 (1925); reprinted inCollected Papers 4 (1984), pp. 157–160.Google Scholar
  153. 153.
    K. F. Bottlinger, Über die Farbenempfindung beim Temperaturleuchten von iridischen Objekten und von Sternen,Naturwissenschaften 13, 180 (1925).Google Scholar
  154. 154.
    T. Oryng, Über die physikalische Definition der bunten Körperfarben,Phys. Z. 26, 185–187 (1925).Google Scholar
  155. 155.
    E. Schrödinger, Über Farbenmessung,Phys. Z. 26, 349–352 (1925); reprinted inCollected Papers 4 (1984), pp. 153–156.Google Scholar
  156. 156.
    E. Schrödinger, p. 351.Google Scholar
  157. 157.
    E. Schrödinger, p. 457.Google Scholar
  158. 158.
    E. Schrödinger, Über das Verhältnis der Vierfarben- zur Dreifarbentheorie,Sitz. Ber. Akad. Wiss. (Wien) 134, 471–490 (1925); reprinted inCollected Papers 4 (1984), pp. 163–182.Google Scholar
  159. 159.
    E. Schrödinger, p. 496.Google Scholar
  160. 160.
    E. Schrödinger, p. 472.Google Scholar
  161. 161.
    E. Schrödinger, p. 489.Google Scholar
  162. 162.
    P. A. Hanle,Erwin Schrödinger's Statistical Mechanics, 1912–1925, Ph.D. thesis, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, 1975; The Coming of Age of Erwin Schrödinger: His Quantum Theory of Ideal Gases,Arch. Hist. Exact Sc. 17, 165–192 (1977).Google Scholar
  163. 163.
    G. de Hevesy and F. Paneth, Zur Frage der isotopen Elemente,Phys. Z. 15, 797–805 (1914).Google Scholar
  164. 164.
    K. Fajans, Zur Frage isotopen Elemente,Phys. Z. 15, 935–940, 940 (1914).Google Scholar
  165. 165.
    K. Fajans, p. 977.Google Scholar
  166. 166.
    E. Schrödinger, Iotopie und Gibbssches Paradoxon,Z. Phys. 5, 163–166 (1921); reprinted inCollected Papers 1 (1984), pp. 308–311.Google Scholar
  167. 167.
    E. Schrödinger, p. 163.Google Scholar
  168. 168.
    J. W. Gibbs,Elementary Principles of Statistical Mechanics, Yale University Press, New Haven (1902), Dover, New York (1960).Google Scholar
  169. 169.
    E. Schrödinger, p. 165.Google Scholar
  170. 170.
    E. Schrödinger, Über die spezifische Wärme fester Körper bei hoher Temperatur und über die Quantelung von Schwingungen endlicher Amplitude,Z. Phys. 11, 170–176 (1922); reprinted inCollected Papers 1 (1984), pp. 312–318.Google Scholar
  171. 171.
    M. Born and E. Brody, Über die spezifische Wärme fester Körper bei hohen Temperaturen,Z. Phys. 6, 132–139 (1921); Über die Schwingungen eines mechanischen Systems mit endlicher Amplitude und ihre Quantelung,Z. Phys. 6, 140–152 (1921).Google Scholar
  172. 172.
    E. Schrödinger, Über das thermische Gleichgewicht zwischen Licht-und Schallstrahlen,Phys. Z. 25, 89–94 (1924); reprinted inCollected Papers 1, (1984) pp. 324–329.Google Scholar
  173. 173.
    L. Brillouin, Diffusion de la lumière et des rayonX par un corps transparent homogène—Influence de l'agitation thermique,Ann. Phys. (9 17, 88–122 (1922).Google Scholar
  174. 174.
    These notes and memoranda have been filed on AHQP Microfilm No. 40, Section 1.Google Scholar
  175. 175.
    A. Smekal, Allgemeine Grundlagen der Quantenstatistik und Quantentheorie,Encykl. Math. Wiss. V/3, 861–1214 (1926).Google Scholar
  176. 176.
    K. Herzfeld, Kinetische Theorie der Wärme, inMüller-Pouillets Lehrbuch der Physik, 11th edn.,Volume III, Part 2, Friedr. Vieweg & Sohn, Braunschweig (1925).Google Scholar
  177. 177.
    E. Schrödinger, Spezifische Wärme (theoretischer Teil), inHandbuch der Physik (H. Geiger and K. Scheel, eds.), Volume 10, Springer, Berlin (1926), pp. 275–320; reprinted inCollected Papers 1 (1984), pp. 365–411.Google Scholar
  178. 178.
    E. Schrödinger, Bemerkung zu zwei Arbeiten des Herrn Elemér Császár über Strahlungstheorie und spezifisch Wärmen,Z. Phys. 25, 173–174 (1924); reprinted inCollected Papers 1 (1984), pp. 330–331.Google Scholar
  179. 179.
    E. Schrödinger, Über die Rotatisnswärme des Wasserstoffs,Z. Phys. 30, 341–349 (1924); reprinted inCollected Papers 4 (1984), pp. 332–340.Google Scholar
  180. 180.
    We might mention at this point that Schrödinger's approach in 1924 did not finally solve the specific heat problem of molecular hydrogen; one still had to wait for the advent of the new quantum mechanics,and also include the spin of the hydrogen nuclei plus the relative distribution of ortho-and para-hydrogen at different temperatures (the latter was done by D. M. Dennison, The Rotation of Molecules,Phys. Rev. (2 28, 318–322 (1926); A Note on the Specific Heat of the Hydrogen Molecule,Proc. R. Soc. London A 115, 483–486).Google Scholar
  181. 181.
    E. Schrödinger, Gasentartung und freie Weglänge,Phys. Z. 25, 41–45 (1924); reprinted inCollected Papers 1 (1984), pp. 319–323.Google Scholar
  182. 182.
    W. Nernst, Über neuere Probleme der Wärmetheorie,Sitz. Ber. Preuss. Akad. Wiss. (Berlin), pp. 65–90 (1911).Google Scholar
  183. 183.
    F. Reiche,Die Quantentheorie: Ihr Ursprung und Ihre Entwicklung, Springer, Berlin (1921); English translation (by H. S. Hatfield and H. L. Brose):The Quantum Theory, Methuen, London (1922).Google Scholar
  184. 184.
    F. Reiche, English translation, p. 79.Google Scholar
  185. 185.
    P. Scherrer, Das ideale Gas als bedingt periodisches System im Sinne der Quantentheorie,Nachr. Ges. Wiss. Göttingen, pp. 154–159 (1916).Google Scholar
  186. 186.
    E. Schrödinger, p. 42.Google Scholar
  187. 187.
    W. K. Keeson, Die chemische Konstante und die Anwendung der Quantentheorie nach der Methode der Eigenschwingungen aud die Zustandsgleichung eines idealen einatomigen Gases,Phys. Z. 15, 695–697 (1914).Google Scholar
  188. 188.
    M. Planck, Zur Theorie des Gesetzes der Energieverteilung im Normalspektrum,Verh. Dtsch. Phys. Ges. (2 2, 237–245 (1900).Google Scholar
  189. 189.
    M. Planck, Über die absolute Entropie einatomiger Körper,Sitz. Ber. Preuss. Akad. Wiss. (Berlin), pp. 653–667 (1916).Google Scholar
  190. 190.
    P. Ehrenfest and V. Trkal, Deduction of the Dissociation Equilibrium from the Theory of Quanta and a Calculation of the Chemical Constant Based on This,Proc. Kon. Akad. Wetensch. (Amsterdam) 23, 162–163 (1920); Ableitung des Dissoziations-gleichgewichts aus der Quantentheorie und darauf beruhende Berechnung der chemischen Konstanten,Ann. Phys. (4) 65, 609–628 (1921).Google Scholar
  191. 191.
    E. Schrödinger, Bemerkungen über die statistische Entropiefunktion beim dealen Gas,Sitz. Ber. Preuss. Akad. Wiss. (Berlin), pp. 434–441 (1925); reprinted inCollected Papers 1 (1984), pp. 341–348.Google Scholar
  192. 192.
    S. N. Bose, Plancks Gesetz und Lichtquantenhypothese,Phys. Z. 11, 483–488 (1924).Google Scholar
  193. 193.
    A. Einstein, Quantentheorie des einatomigen idealen Gases,Sitz. Ber. Preuss. Akad. Wiss. (Berlin), pp. 261–267 (1924).Google Scholar
  194. 194.
    A. Einstein, Quantentheorie des einatomigen idealen Gases,Sitz. Ber. Preuss. Akad. Wiss. (Berlin), pp. 3–14 (1925).Google Scholar
  195. 195.
    A. Einstein, Zur Quantentheorie des idealen Gases,Sitz. Ber. Preuss. Akad. Wiss. (Berlin), pp. 18–25 (1925).Google Scholar
  196. 196.
    E. Schrödinger, Ref. 191, pp. 434–435.Google Scholar
  197. 197.
    A. Schidlof, Les quanta du rayonnement et la théorie des gaz,Arch. Sci. Phys. Nat. (5 6, 281–293, 381–392 (1924).Google Scholar
  198. 198.
    E. Schrödinger, Ref. 191, pp. 436–437.Google Scholar
  199. 199.
    E. Schrödinger, Ref. 191, p. 438.Google Scholar
  200. 200.
    E. Schrödinger, Ref. 191, p. 440.Google Scholar
  201. 201.
    E. Schrödinger, Die Energiestufen des idealen einatomigen Gasmodells,Sitz. Ber. Preuss. Akad. Wiss. (Berlin), pp. 23–36 (1926); reprinted inCollected Papers 3 (1984), pp. 59–72.Google Scholar
  202. 202.
    E. Schrödinger, Zur Einsteinschen Gastheorie,Phys. Z. 27, 95–101 (1926); reprinted inCollected Papers 3 (1984), pp. 59–72.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jagdish Mehra
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Instituts Internationaux de Physique et de Chimie (Solvay)BrusselsBelgium
  2. 2.Houston

Personalised recommendations