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Journal of Protein Chemistry

, Volume 15, Issue 1, pp 59–61 | Cite as

Do “antisense proteins” exist?

  • Kuo-Chen Chou
  • Chun-Ting Zhang
  • David W. Elrod
Article

Abstract

A DNA double helix consists of two complementary strands antiparallel with each other. One of them is the sense chain, while the other is an antisense chain which does not directly involve the protein-encoding process. The reason that an antisense chain cannot encode for a protein is generally attributed to the lack of certain preconditions such as a promotor and some necessary sequence segments. Suppose it were provided with all these preconditions, could an antisense chain encode for an “antisense protein”? To answer this question, an analysis has been performed based on the existing database. Nine proteins have been found that have a 100% sequence match with the hypothetical antisense proteins derived from the knownEscherichia coli antisense chains.

Key words

DNA genetic coding protein sequence match 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kuo-Chen Chou
    • 1
  • Chun-Ting Zhang
    • 1
  • David W. Elrod
    • 1
  1. 1.Computer-Aided Drug Discovery, Upjohn LaboratoriesPharmacia & Upjohn Inc.Kalamazoo

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