Advertisement

Documenta Ophthalmologica

, Volume 49, Issue 2, pp 325–335 | Cite as

A simple psychophysical technique provides early diagnosis in optic neuritis

  • Emilio C. Campos
  • Jay M. Enoch
  • Constance R. Fitzgerald
  • Marcus D. Benedetto
Article

Abstract

Patients with optic neuritis describe image fading which is particularly evident at bright light levels. The effect is dependent on adaptation level, and high adaptation levels serve as a provocative test. Kinetic and static perimetry and interferometric acuity tests repeated in time reveal this loss in sensitivity. The latter test, using a large field and a high luminance level, is particularly sensitive to both the residua of pathology and very early phases of disease, often before subjective manifestations of anomalies are present. These effects are large in patients with demyelinating diseases. Here, we show that such changes may be revealed in optic neuritis due to other causes as well. Note, the same form of response may be detected in more central lesions, but usually in more circumscribed areas of field.

Keywords

Optic neuritis Papillitis Ischaemic optic neuropathy Demyelinating diseases Perimetry Interferometric acuity 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Enoch, J.M. Quantitative layer-by-layer perimetry. The Francis I. Proctor Lecture, 1977.Invest. Ophthalmol. 17:199–257 (1978).Google Scholar
  2. Enoch, J.M., Bedell, H.E. & Kaufman, H.E. Interferometric visual acuity in anterior segment pathology.Arch. Ophthalmol. (In press).Google Scholar
  3. Enoch, J.M. & Campos, E.C. Analysis of patients with open-angle glaucoma using perimetric techniques reflecting receptive field-like properties.Doc. Ophthalmol. Proc. Series 19:137–149 (1979).Google Scholar
  4. Enoch, J.M., Campos, E.C. & Bedell, H.E. Visual resolution in a patient exhibiting a visual fatigue or saturation-like effect: Probable multiple sclerosis.Arch. Ophthalmol. 97:176–178 (1979).Google Scholar
  5. Enoch, J.M., Campos, E.C., Greer, M. & Trobe, J. Measurement of visual resolution at high luminance levels in patients with possible demyelinating disease.Int. Ophthalmol. 1:99–104 (1979).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. Enoch, J.M. & Lawrence, B. A perimetric technique believed to test receptive field properties: Sequential evaluation in glaucoma and other conditions.Am. J. Ophthalmol. 80:734–758 (1975).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. Enoch, J.M., Ohzu, H. & Itoi, M. Contrast (modulation) sensitivity functions measured in patients with high refractive errors with emphasis on aphakia: I. Theoretical considerations.Doc. Ophthalmol. 47:139–145 (1979).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. Enoch, J.M. & Sunga, R. Development of quantitative perimetric tests.Doc. Ophthalmol. 26:215–229 (1969).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. Enoch, J.M., Yamade, S. & Namba, A. Contrast (modulation) sensitivity functions measured in patients with high refractive errors with emphasis on aphakia: II. Determinations on patients.Doc. Ophthalmol. 47:147–162 (1979).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. Sunga, R. & Enoch, J.M. Further perimetric analysis of patients with lesions of the visual pathways.Am. J. Ophthalmol. 70:403–422 (1970).PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Dr. W. Junk B.V. Publishers 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Emilio C. Campos
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Jay M. Enoch
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Constance R. Fitzgerald
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Marcus D. Benedetto
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.ModenaItaly
  2. 2.New OrleansUSA
  3. 3.GainesvilleUSA
  4. 4.Clinica Oculistica della Universitá PoliclinicoModenaItaly

Personalised recommendations