Plant and Soil

, Volume 26, Issue 2, pp 361–368 | Cite as

Studies on nutrition of Indian cereals

I. The uptake of nitrogen by wheat plants at various stages of growth as influenced by phosphorus
  • O. N. Mehrotra
  • N. S. Sinha
  • R. D. L. Srivastava
Article

Summary

Nutritional studies on wheat were carried out on sandy loam soils of Lucknow for a period of three years. Plant analysis for nitrogen was carried out at various growth stages of wheat plant. The important conclusions emerging out of these studies are as follows:
  1. 1

    Two peak periods of nitrogen efficiencyi.e., first at tillering and second at ear-initiation stage were observed.

     
  2. 2

    Maximum uptake of nitrogen and protein content was noted in treatment where nitrogen at 56 kg N was applied with 44.8 kg P2O5 per hectare.

     
  3. 3

    The rate of nitrogen uptake from seedling to tillering was about 45 per cent; from jointing to ear initiation 25 per cent, and 30 per cent upto grain-formation stages in wheat plant's life cycle.

     
  4. 4

    Best recovery of nitrogen of 53 per cent was noted in treatment where 56 kg N + 44.8 kg P2O5 per hectare was applied.

     

Keywords

Nitrogen Life Cycle Protein Content Plant Physiology Growth Stage 

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff 1967

Authors and Affiliations

  • O. N. Mehrotra
    • 1
  • N. S. Sinha
    • 1
  • R. D. L. Srivastava
    • 1
  1. 1.Agriculture DepartmentCrop Physiology Section, KanpurUttar PradeshIndia

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