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European Journal of Plant Pathology

, Volume 102, Issue 3, pp 247–255 | Cite as

Biological control of damping-off caused byPythium ultimum andRhizoctonia solani usingTrichoderma spp. applied as industrial film coatings on seeds

Biological control of damping-off
  • Sophie Cliquet
  • Rudy J. Scheffer
Research Articles

Abstract

Conidia of sevenTrichoderma strains were applied on cucumber or radish seeds as a simple methyl cellulose coating or through an industrial film coating process. The seeds were sown in a peat-based soil artificially infested byR. solani orP. ultimum. Four strains controlled damping-off caused byR. solani when applied as a simple coating or as an industrial film-coating. Also, four strains significantly reduced damping-off caused byP. ultimum in cucumber. A correlation was found between production of volatile antibiotics in vitro and control ofP. ultimum. Survival during storage varied according to the strain. Better survival was observed for two strains, with a decrease in conidial viability of one order of magnitude after storage for three and five months at 15 ° C and 4 ° C, respectively. The results show the feasibility of biocontrol of seedling diseases by some antagonists applied onto seeds through an industrial film-coating process.

Key words

damping-off film coating Pythium ultimum Rhizoctonia solani survival Trichoderma spp 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sophie Cliquet
    • 1
  • Rudy J. Scheffer
    • 1
  1. 1.Technology DepartmentS&G Seeds B.V.AA EnkhuizenThe Netherlands

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