Tomato infectious chlorosis virus — a new clostero-like virus transmitted byTrialeurodes vaporariorum

Abstract

A previously undescribed virus disease of tomato, other crops and weed hosts was found in California. Affected tomato plants exhibited interveinal yellowing, necrosis and severe yield losses. Leaf dips and purified preparations contained closterovirus-like long flexuous, filamentous particles approximately 12×850–900 nm. The virus, designated as tomato infectious chlorosis virus (TICV), is transmitted in a semipersistent manner by the greenhouse whitefly,Trialeurodes vaporariorum. The host range of the virus is moderate (26 species in 8 plant families) but includes some important crops and ornamental species including tomato, (Lycopersicon esculentum), tomatillo (Physalis ixocarpa), potato (Solanum tuberosum), artichoke (Cynara scolymus), lettuce (Lactuca sativa) and petunia (Petunia hybrida). The virus has been found in a number of different locations in California and has a number of potential vehicles of movement including greenhouse grown ornamentals, tomato transplants, artichoke cuttings and potato seed. The virus has the potential to spread to other growing regions with resident populations of the greenhouse whitefly. The host range, particle size, insect transmission, and serology clearly distinguish TICV from previously described viruses.

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Duffus, J.E., Liu, H.Y. & Wisler, G.C. Tomato infectious chlorosis virus — a new clostero-like virus transmitted byTrialeurodes vaporariorum . Eur J Plant Pathol 102, 219–226 (1996). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01877960

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Key words

  • artichoke virus
  • BPYV
  • CYSDV
  • greenhouse whitefly
  • LIYV
  • Lycopersicon virus
  • potato virus
  • solanum virus
  • viruses
  • whitefly transmission
  • yellowing virus