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European Journal of Plant Pathology

, Volume 102, Issue 7, pp 697–705 | Cite as

Biological characteristics of maize dwarf mosaic potyvirus from Spain

  • M. Angeles Achon
  • Marion Pinner
  • Vicente Medina
  • George P. Lomonossoff
Research Articles

Abstract

Two isolates of maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV-Sp and MDMV-Spl) obtained from maize in the northeast of Spain were studied. Both isolates induced similar reactions on 6 sorghum cultivars, johnsongrass and oat (cv. Clintland), with the exception of MDMV-Sp which produced a different reaction on one sorghum cultivar. Thirty-three grass species were tested as possible hosts (16 previously untested) and 18 were found to be susceptible. Among those, eight were previously unidentified hosts for MDMV:Aegilops ovata, A. ventricosa, Avena barbata, Bromus alopecurus, B. diandrus, B. fasciculatus, Echinaria capitata andLolium rigidum. Both isolates were transmitted from maize to maize nonpersistently byRhopalosiphum maidis, R. padi, Schizaphis graminum andSitobium avenae. The virus was not seed-transmitted in Mo17 and B73 maize inbred lines. Pinwheels, scrolls and short curved laminated aggregates were observed in the cytoplasm of maize cells infected by MDMV-Sp or MDMV-Sp1. In addition, laminated aggregates were observed in cells infected by MDMV-Sp1.

Key words

aphid host range seed-transmission 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Angeles Achon
    • 1
  • Marion Pinner
    • 2
  • Vicente Medina
    • 1
  • George P. Lomonossoff
    • 2
  1. 1.Area de Proteccio de ConreusCentre UdL-IRTALleidaSpain
  2. 2.Department of Virus ResearchJohn Innes CentreNorwichUK

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