Advertisement

The Journal of Membrane Biology

, Volume 56, Issue 1, pp 9–18 | Cite as

Frequency entrainment of squid axon membrane

  • Rita Guttman
  • Lance Feldman
  • Eric Jakbsson
Articles

Summary

Sinusoidally varying stimulating currents were applied to space-clamped squid giant axon membranes in a double sucrose gap apparatus. Stimulus parameters varied were peak-to-peak current amplitude, frequency, and DC offset bias. In response to these stimuli, the membranes produced action potentials in varying patterns, according to variation of input stimulus parameters. For some stimulus parameters the output patterns were stable and obviously periodic with the periods being simple multiples of the input period; for other stimulus parameters no obvious periodicity was manifest in the output. The experimental results were compared with simulations using a computer model which was modified in several ways from the Hodgkin-Huxley model to make it more representative of our preparation. The model takes into account K+ accumulation in the periaxonal space, features of Na+ inactivation which are anomalous to the Hodgkin-Huxley model, sucrose gap hyperpolarization current, and membrane current noise. Many aspects of the experiments are successfully simulated but some are not, possibly because some very slow process present in the preparation is not included in the model.

Keywords

Current Noise Stimulus Parameter Input Stimulus Output Pattern Giant Axon 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Adelman, W.J., Jr., FitzHugh, R. 1975. Solutions of the Hodgkin-Huxley equations modified for potassium accumulation in a periaxonal space.Fed. Proc. 34:1322Google Scholar
  2. Adelman, W.J., Jr., Palti, Y. 1969. The influence of external potassium on the inactivation of sodium currents in the giant axon of the squid,Loligo pealei.J. Gen. Physiol. 53:685Google Scholar
  3. Fishman, H.M., Moore, L.E., Poussart, D.J.M. 1975. Potassiumion conduction noise in squid axon membrane.J. Membrane Biol. 24:305Google Scholar
  4. Flaherty, J.B., Hoppenstaedt, F.C. 1978. Frequency entrainment of a forced van der Pol oscillator.Stud. Appl. Math. 58:5Google Scholar
  5. Guttman, R. 1969. Temperature dependence of oscillation in squid axons: Comparison of experiments with computations.Biophys. J. 9:269Google Scholar
  6. Hodgkin, A.L., Huxley, A.F. 1952. The dual effect of membrane potential on sodium conductance in the giant axon ofLoligo.J. Physiol. (London) 116:497Google Scholar
  7. Holden, A.V. 1976. The response of excitable membrane models to a cyclic input.Biol. Cybernetics 21:1Google Scholar
  8. Jakobsson, E. 1978a. A fully coupled transient excited state model for the sodium channel. I. Conductance in the voltage clamped case.J. Math. Biol. 5:121Google Scholar
  9. Jakobsson, E. 1978b. A fully coupled transient excited state model for the sodium channel. II. Implications for action potential generation, threshold, respective firing, and accommodation.J. Math. Biol. 6:235Google Scholar
  10. Julian, F.J., Moore, J.W., Goldman, D.E. 1962. Membrane potentials of the lobster giant axon obtained by use of the sucrosegap technique.J. Gen. Physiol. 45:1195Google Scholar
  11. Nemoto, I., Miyazaki, S., Saito, M., Utsunomiya, T. 1975. Behavior of solutions of the Hodgkin-Huxley equations and its relation to properties of mechanoreceptors.Biophys. J. 15:469Google Scholar
  12. Speckhart, F.H., Green, W.L. 1976. A Guide to Using CSMP-The Continous System Modeling Program. Prentice-Hall, Englewood CliffsGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rita Guttman
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Lance Feldman
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Eric Jakbsson
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Brooklyn College of the City University of New YorkBrooklyn
  2. 2.Marine Biological LaboratoryWoods Hole
  3. 3.Department of Physiology and BiophysicsUniversity of IllinoisUrbana

Personalised recommendations