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Environmental Management

, Volume 8, Issue 1, pp 45–53 | Cite as

Regional planning acceptance by residents of Northern New York, USA

  • Patricia Bobrow
  • Barbara Gaige
  • Glenn Harris
  • Joyce Kennedy
  • Leslie King
  • William Raymond
  • Darrin Werbitsky
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Abstract

This study compares the effectiveness of two regional planning agencies in terms of public support for various planning activities. The Adirondack Park Agency and the Temporary State Commission on Tug Hill have fundamentally different approaches to planning. The Adirondack Park Agency has implemented a restrictive regulatory program with little citizen participation by Adirondack residents. The Tug Hill Commission has implemented an advisory and coordinating program with an emphasis on public input. Residents of two towns in each region were surveyed to determine environmental concern and support for regional planning activities. Respondents from both regions favored a planning agency that incorporates citizen input; controls air, water, and toxic waste pollution; and develops recreation areas. They strongly opposed an agency that regulates private land-use. Basic demographic characteristics and levels of environmental concern were similar in all four towns, but receptivity to various planning activities was consistently greater among residents of the Tug Hill Region. Paired comparisons of the four towns demonstrated no differences between towns of the same region and significant differences between towns of different regions. Public support for regional planning is greater in the Tug Hill Region than in the Adirondack Park.

Key words

Land-use planning Environmental management Public opinion Environmental organization 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patricia Bobrow
    • 1
  • Barbara Gaige
    • 1
  • Glenn Harris
    • 1
  • Joyce Kennedy
    • 1
  • Leslie King
    • 1
  • William Raymond
    • 1
  • Darrin Werbitsky
    • 1
  1. 1.Environmental Studies ProgramSt. Lawrence UniversityCanton

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