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International Journal of Stress Management

, Volume 1, Issue 4, pp 299–307 | Cite as

Nitroglycerin relieves emotional stress-induced stomach ulcers in rats

  • Akitane Mori
  • Kiminao Mizukawa
  • Hideaki Kabuto
  • Isao Yokoi
  • Takayoshi Jisho
  • F. J. McGuigan
Article

Abstract

It is known that nitroglycerin (GTN) can be converted to form a nitric oxide (NO) molecule which is a highly reactive and unstable free radical species. NO is known to have many beneficial effects such as relaxing blood vessels, promoting digestive activity, and regulating blood pressure. The first experiment established an additional effect of NO, that GTN can help prevent emotionally-induced stomach stress ulcers in rats. In Experiment 2, we sought to estimate the quantity of nitrogen oxides in serum produced by GTN that is administered subcutaneously to rats. The results indicated that rats administered GTN increased significantly the amount of serum NO2 and NO3, relative to values for a control group. Since amounts of NO2 and NO3 reflect amount of NO, the administration of GTN significantly increased amount of NO. An implication of this research is that chemicals such as GTN may be used in therapy with humans for the prevention of some kinds of ulcers. Furthermore, while NO is commonly recognized as a pollutant, it has a number of beneficial effects on the body, e. g., it may slow the aging process, contribute to therapy for improtency, and facilitate memory processes.

Key Words

stress ulcers nitroglycerin (GTN) nitric oxide (NO) 

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Akitane Mori
    • 1
  • Kiminao Mizukawa
    • 1
  • Hideaki Kabuto
    • 1
  • Isao Yokoi
    • 1
  • Takayoshi Jisho
    • 1
  • F. J. McGuigan
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of NeuroscienceOkayama University Medical SchoolOkayamaJapan
  2. 2.Institute for Stress ManagementU.S. International UniversitySan DiegoUSA

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