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Biological Cybernetics

, Volume 41, Issue 1, pp 47–57 | Cite as

On the function of cell systems in area 18. Part I

  • H. R. O. Dinse
  • W. von Seelen
Article

Abstract

Proceeding from previous studies on cells in area 18, neurophysiological experiments were carried out using combinations of deterministic and statistical stimuli. The evaluation of the results on the space, time and amplitude characteristics of the cells show that for nearly all cells in this area, pattern distorition and shift due to motion are eliminated by spatial asymmetry of the coupling and specific combinations of on-off systems. So, the extraction of features despite pattern movement is possible in area 18. The features are extracted in the low spatial frequency range.

Keywords

Spatial Frequency Pattern Movement Cell System Statistical Stimulus Specific Combination 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. R. O. Dinse
    • 1
  • W. von Seelen
    • 1
  1. 1.Arbeitsgruppe III (Biophysik), Institut für ZoologieJohannes-Gutenberg-UniversitätMainzFRG

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