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Computers and the Humanities

, Volume 29, Issue 6, pp 431–448 | Cite as

Electronic literacy, critical pedagogy, and collaboration: A case for cyborg writing

  • Carol L. Winkelmann
Article

Abstract

This study concerns the convergence of electronic literacy, collaboration, and critical pedagogy in the classroom. I argue that teachers in the humanities must relinquish the vestiges of non-electronic criteria in their assessments of electronic literacy. Instead, the interplay of human and technological factors in the classroom leads to a reaffirmation of literacy as a social process. The radical democratization and multivocality of the corporate or collaboratively-written text demands a critical problematizing of our roles and actions as teacher-readers. The viability of static criteria for good literacy practices vanishes with electronic literacy. Feminist cyborg theory offers a useful paradigm for understanding the corporate text by bridging theories of electronic literacy and theories of collaborative learning. The cyborg is a dynamic techno-fusion of difference and contradiction: much like the corporate text. A cyborgian perspective reaffirms the polyvocalic, instable nature of postmodern literacy and calls for contextual writing criteria.

Key words

electronic literacy collaborative writing collaborative learning computers and composition feminist cyborg theory corporate texts 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carol L. Winkelmann
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of EnglishXavier UniversityCincinnatiUSA

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