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Acta Neurochirurgica

, Volume 131, Issue 3–4, pp 226–228 | Cite as

The risk of cancer in relatives of patients with brain neoplasm

  • D. Sakas
  • N. Kalfakis
  • M. Panas
  • D. Vassilopoulos
  • P. Carvounis
Clinical Articles

Summary

The family trees of 142 patients, suffering from histologically proven brain tumour, were compared to those of an equal number of sex and age matched controls. The results showed no statistically significant differences in the occurrence of malignant neoplasm between the two groups. These results indicate that the risk of cancer among relatives of patients with brain tumours does not exceed that of healthy controls.

Keywords

Brain tumour family genetics 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Sakas
    • 1
  • N. Kalfakis
    • 1
  • M. Panas
    • 1
  • D. Vassilopoulos
    • 1
  • P. Carvounis
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of NeurologyAthens National University, Eginition HospitalAthensGreece
  2. 2.Department of NeurosurgeryAthens National University, Evangelismos HospitalAthensGreece

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