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In defence of speech codes

Abstract

It has been strongly maintained that speech codes at universities interfere with academic freedom, and also, to the contrary, that such speech codes must be developed to restrain appeals to academic freedom that function to restrain the freedom of marginalized groups to participate fully in the university. This essay argues that forms of speech can in fact constrain the freedom, including legitimate academic freedom, of many persons, not only, but importantly including, marginalized groups; that speech codes have always existed; and that reasonable ones can be developed which do not interfere with freedom of teaching, learning, and research in the university; and in particular that definitions of academic freedom such as that developed by the Canadian Association of University Teachers (CAUT) are compatible with such speech codes.

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Wilson, F. In defence of speech codes. Interchange 27, 125–159 (1996). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01807292

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01807292

Keywords

  • speech codes
  • academic freedom
  • climate issues
  • free speech