Interchange

, Volume 18, Issue 1–2, pp 124–135 | Cite as

Literacy in Fiji: Its origins and its development

  • Francis Mangubhai
Article

Abstract

Literacy was introduced into Fiji by Christian missionaries just over 150 years ago, and for almost 100 years limited literacy practices were fostered by schools run mainly by the churches. With the rise of towns and of a bureaucracy, literacy in English as a second language was also introduced. But the levels of literacy in both vernacular and the second languages have been generally low, especially in the rural areas. A research project set up to improve literacy in educational contexts is described. Current problems related to literacy and future developments are discussed.

Keywords

Rural Area Future Development Current Problem Educational Context Limited Literacy 

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Copyright information

© The Ontario Institute for Studies in Education 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Francis Mangubhai
    • 1
  1. 1.The University of the South Pacific and OISECanada

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