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Breast Cancer Research and Treatment

, Volume 10, Issue 1, pp 21–29 | Cite as

A breast cancer nutrition adjuvant study (NAS): Protocol design and initial patient adherence

  • Rowan T. Chlebowski
  • Daniel W. Nixon
  • George L. Blackburn
  • Peter Jochimsen
  • Edward F. Scanlon
  • William InsullJr
  • I. Marilyn Buzzard
  • Robert Elashoff
  • Ritva Butrum
  • Ernst L. Wynder
Report

Abstract

To evaluate the feasibility of using a reduction in dietary fat intake as a component of treatment regimens for patients with resected breast cancer, a multi-disciplinary cooperative group protocol was developed. Females 50 to 75 years of age with stage II breast cancer who completed primary local therapy were eligible for randomization to a Control Dietary Group in which dietary fat intake was to remain unchanged from baseline level (at approximately 38% of calories derived from fat) and an Intensive Intervention Dietary Group designed to reduce dietary fat intake. Both Dietary Groups were given tamoxifen 20 mg/day. To facilitate early experience with dietary regimen delivery, patients entered during an initial pilot phase could receive any chemotherapy and/or hormonal treatment. A prerandomization nutrition ‘run-in’ of clinically eligible patients assessed adherence to nutrition data collection procedures and screened patients for nutrition eligibility criteria. Of 59 patients beginning ‘run-in’, 49 were randomized and, at present, 32 have completed at least three months follow-up. The change in dietary fat intake (as assessed by Four Day Food Records) seen in both arms is outlined below.

Key words

adjuvant treatment body weight dietary fat reduction nutritional disorders 

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff Publishers 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rowan T. Chlebowski
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
    • 6
    • 7
    • 8
    • 9
  • Daniel W. Nixon
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
    • 6
    • 7
    • 8
    • 9
  • George L. Blackburn
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
    • 6
    • 7
    • 8
    • 9
  • Peter Jochimsen
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
    • 6
    • 7
    • 8
    • 9
  • Edward F. Scanlon
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
    • 6
    • 7
    • 8
    • 9
  • William InsullJr
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
    • 6
    • 7
    • 8
    • 9
  • I. Marilyn Buzzard
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
    • 6
    • 7
    • 8
    • 9
  • Robert Elashoff
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
    • 6
    • 7
    • 8
    • 9
  • Ritva Butrum
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
    • 6
    • 7
    • 8
    • 9
  • Ernst L. Wynder
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
    • 6
    • 7
    • 8
    • 9
  1. 1.The UCLA School of Medicine, Harbor-UCLA Medical CenterTorranceUSA
  2. 2.Emory UniversityAtlantaUSA
  3. 3.New England Deaconess HospitalBostonUSA
  4. 4.University of Iowa HospitalsIowa CityUSA
  5. 5.Lipid Research ClinicHoustonUSA
  6. 6.University of Minnesota School of Public HealthMinneapolisUSA
  7. 7.UCLA School of Public HealthLos AngelesUSA
  8. 8.The National Cancer InstituteBethesdaUSA
  9. 9.the American Health FoundationNew YorkUSA

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