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Journal of Inherited Metabolic Disease

, Volume 12, Issue 1, pp 13–22 | Cite as

Transient neonatal tyrosinaemia

  • D. N. Rice
  • I. B. Houston
  • I. C. T. Lyon
  • B. A. Macarthur
  • P. R. Mullins
  • A. M. O. Veale
  • R. Guthrie
Article

Summary

Children who had presented with transient neonatal tyrosinaemia (TNT) were compared with a group of unaffected controls at 7–9 years of age. A comprehensive psychometric assessment revealed significant differences between the groups in adaptive behaviour, psycholinguistic abilities, and speed of learning. In nearly all components of the tests used, higher levels of TNT were associated with lower levels of performance. This study demonstrates that TNT, a condition commonly regarded as benign in the short term, has long-term effects which may be detrimental to the child in school.

Keywords

Public Health Internal Medicine Metabolic Disease Adaptive Behaviour Unaffected Control 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© SSIEM and Kluwer Academic Publishers 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. N. Rice
    • 2
  • I. B. Houston
    • 1
  • I. C. T. Lyon
    • 1
  • B. A. Macarthur
    • 2
  • P. R. Mullins
    • 1
  • A. M. O. Veale
    • 1
  • R. Guthrie
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Community Health, School of MedicineUniversity of AucklandAuckland
  2. 2.Department of EducationUniversity of AucklandAuckland
  3. 3.Department of PediatricsState University of New York at BuffaloUSA

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