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Geologische Rundschau

, Volume 47, Issue 2, pp 543–561 | Cite as

Cauldron subsidences, granitic rocks, and crustal fracturing in S. E. Australia

  • E. Sherbon Hills
Aufsätze

Abstract

The structure and history of several Devonian cauldron-subsidences and related granitic intrusions showing evidence of sub-surface ring-fracturing in South Eastern Australia are discussed. The Marysville Igneous Complex includes fish and plant bearing beds in the Acheron Cauldron, which has a diameter of 15 miles, and contains 6000 ft. of acid lavas, with subordinate andesites and basalts. Most of the occurrences are consanguineous. The parent magma is intermediate, close to the hypersthene dacites of the region, and is believed to have been injected as a magma wedge from the east.

Keywords

Devonian Granitic Rock Parent Magma South Eastern Granitic Intrusion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Ferdinand Enke Verlag Stuttgart 1959

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Sherbon Hills
    • 1
  1. 1.University of MelbourneAustralia

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