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Journal of Inherited Metabolic Disease

, Volume 5, Issue 1, pp 17–19 | Cite as

The use of deuterated phenylalanine for thein vivo assay of phenylalanine hydroxylase activity in children

  • R. Matalon
  • D. E. Matthews
  • K. Michals
  • D. Bier
Article

Abstract

Fifteen children, five with phenylketonuria (PKU), five with hyperphenylalaninaemia, and five phenotypically normal but at risk of being carriers for PKU, were given [ring2H5]phenylalanine orally in amounts ranging from 75 mg/kg to 10 mg/kg. Plama was assayed for [2H5]phenylalanine and [2H4]tyrosine at hourly intervals, the amino acids being measured as theN-acetyl, n-propyl esters by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. The results obtained were calculated as the log of the ratio [2H5]phenylalanine: [2H4]tyrosine in the plasma. The five patients with PKU had ratios of infinity because no [2H4]tyrosine was measured in their plasma during the experimental period. The patients with hyperphenylalaninaemia had log ratios over 2.00 throughout the assay period. Among the five normal children three are considered to be carriers for PKU as the logarithms of the [2H5]phenylalanine: [2H4]tyrosine ratios were 1.77, 1.73, and 1.33 and remained over 1.00 during the assay period. The other children had log ratios of 1.16 and 1.00 at the first hour which dropped below 1.00 subsequently, suggesting normal activity of phenylalanine hydroxylase.

Keywords

Ester Tyrosine Metabolic Disease Phenylalanine Experimental Period 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© MTP Press Limited 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Matalon
    • 1
    • 2
  • D. E. Matthews
    • 1
    • 2
  • K. Michals
    • 1
    • 2
  • D. Bier
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Departments of Pediatrics and MedicineUniversity of IllinoisChicago
  2. 2.Washington UniversitySt LouisUSA

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