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Journal of Inherited Metabolic Disease

, Volume 15, Issue 4, pp 526–531 | Cite as

Isolation of cDNA sequences around the chromosomal breakpoint in a female with lowe syndrome by direct screening of cDNA libraries with yeast artificial chromosomes

  • I. Okabe
  • O. Attree
  • L. C. Bailey
  • D. L. Nelson
  • R. L. Nussbaum
The X Chromosome

Summary

The Lowe oculocerebrorenal syndrome (OCRL; McKusick 309000) is an X-linked disorder characterized by congenital cataracts, muscular hypotonia, mental retardation, and Fanconi syndrome of the renal tubules. A pair of yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) that span the Xq25-q26 translocation breakpoint in a female with OCRL were used as probes to screen cDNA libraries made from bovine lens and human kidney. The methods used to prepare the YACs as probes and to screen the libraries are presented in detail. Two different transcripts were found that map to the region around the Xq25-q26 breakpoint. These transcripts are now being studied to determine whether one or the other is a candidate gene for OCRL.

Keywords

Candidate Gene Metabolic Disease Cataract cDNA Library Mental Retardation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© SSIEM and Kluwer Academic Publishers 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. Okabe
    • 1
  • O. Attree
    • 1
  • L. C. Bailey
    • 1
  • D. L. Nelson
    • 2
  • R. L. Nussbaum
    • 1
  1. 1.Howard Hughes Medical Institute LaboratoryUniversity of Pennsylvania School of MedicinePhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.Institute for Molecular GeneticsBaylor College of MedicineHoustonUSA

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