Primates

, Volume 9, Issue 1–2, pp 45–68 | Cite as

The Nilgiri langur (Presbytis johnii) mother-infant dyad

  • Frank E. Poirier
Article

Abstract

There is considerable inter-generic and inter-specific variation in the mode and quality of the mother-infant relationship. Although the Nilgiri langur mother-infant dyad resembles that reported for most colobids, there are important differences. The Nilgiri and south Indian langur mother-infant pattern resemble each other more than each resembles the north Indian pattern. The Nilgiri langur mother-infant relationship differs from the north Indian pattern (especially) in the relative disinterestedness the Nilgiri langur mother exhibits for her infant, the earlier onset of weaning, the limited period of infant transferring, and the limited amount of mother-infant social interaction.

It is suggested that the quality of the mother-infant bond influences the infant's socialization experience and hence, affects the social order. Therefore, the Nilgiri langur social organization reflects adjustments to not only an arboreal existence, a lack of predation and correlated features, but also to processes linked to the mother-infant relationship social interaction.

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Copyright information

© Japan Monkey Centre 1968

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frank E. Poirier
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry Division of Behavioral ScienceUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA

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