Clinical & Experimental Metastasis

, Volume 6, Issue 3, pp 221–232 | Cite as

Preferential growth of metastatic tumors at the pleural surface of mouse lung

  • F. W. Orr
  • L. Young
  • G. M. King
  • I. Y. R. Adamson
Article

Abstract

In an experimental model of lung metastasis we have observed that more metastatic tumors are located on the pleura of the lung than in the parenchyma. To study possible reasons for this differential pattern we have now related the initial distribution of injected tumor cells to the later location and growth rate of metastases in different regions of the lung in C57bl/6 mice. It was found that labeled murine fibrosarcoma cells were evenly distributed throughout the lungs 24 h after intravenous injection into controls and animals previously treated with bleomycin or by exposure to hyperoxia. These treatments, known to induce pulmonary endothelial injury, were associated with increased tumor cell localization in the lung. In all cases, using morphometric methods, we found that after 2 weeks, ∼75 per cent of metastatic tumors were located at the pleura. By [3H]thymidine labeling in autoradiographs, pleural tumors in all experimental groups had a growth rate 1·4 times the growth rate of tumors located in the internal regions of the lung.In vitro, the fibrosarcoma cells proliferated more rapidly on connective tissue matrices prepared from normal pleuras than they did on matrices from the remainder of the lung. Protease digestion of these matrices indicated differences in composition with more insoluble collagen, probably type I collagen, present at the pleura. These data suggest that, in spite of the initial random distribution and localization of tumor cells in the lung, there is preferential growth of metastatic tumors at the pleura which may be related to regional differences in the composition of the extracellular matrix.

Keywords

Metastatic Tumor Bleomycin Mouse Lung Preferential Growth Tissue Matrice 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. W. Orr
    • 1
  • L. Young
    • 2
  • G. M. King
    • 2
  • I. Y. R. Adamson
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Pathology and Oncology Research GroupMcMaster UniversityHamiltonCanada
  2. 2.Department of PathologyUniversity of ManitobaCanada

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