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Urinary factors of kidney stone formation in patients with Crohn's disease

Summary

An increased frequency of kidney stone formation is reported in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. In order to investigate its pathogenesis, the concentrations of factors known to enhance calcium oxalate stone formation (oxalate, calcium, uric acid) as well as of inhibitory factors for nephrolithiasis (magnesium, citrate) were determined in the urine of 86 patients with Crohn's disease and compared with those of 53 metabolically healthy controls. Six patients with Crohn's disease already had experienced calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis. Patients with Crohn's disease had significantly higher urinary oxalate and lower magnesium and citrate concentrations. Among all patients magnesium and citrate were significantly lower in those with a positive history of kidney stones. Our results demonstrate that the increased propensity for renal stone formation in patients with Crohn's disease is a result not only of increased urinary oxalate, but also of decreased urinary magnesium and citrate concentrations.

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Abbreviations

CDAI:

Crohn's disease activity index

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Dedicated to Professor Dr. N. Zöllner on the occasion of his 65th birthday

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Böhles, H., Beifuss, O.J., Brandl, U. et al. Urinary factors of kidney stone formation in patients with Crohn's disease. Klin Wochenschr 66, 87–91 (1988). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01774220

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01774220

Key words

  • Crohn's disease
  • Nephrolithiasis
  • Oxalate
  • Magnesium
  • Citrate