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Hematological analyses of the Japanese monkey (Macaca fuscata)

Abstract

Various hematological examinations were performed on a total of 208 Japanese monkeys (Macaca fuscata). One hundred and fifty-eight of the monkeys were originally from different habitats in the western part of Japan, where they existed as free-ranging animals. The remaining 50 monkeys were kept in an open-enclosure for about one year. Laboratory examinations on blood specimens included the following; the erythrocyte and leukocyte counts, hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit, the specific gravity of the blood and plasma, protein concentration of the plasma, SGO-T, SGP-T, A/G ratio and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Results were similar to those reported for otherMacaca species. When the data reported here was compared with the known values for man, the Japanese monkey showed lower values for the erythrocyte count, hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit, and the specific gravity of the blood. Higher values were shown for the leukocyte count and SGO-T activity, with a wider overall range of variation.

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Nigi, H., Tanaka, T. & Noguchi, Y. Hematological analyses of the Japanese monkey (Macaca fuscata). Primates 8, 107–120 (1967). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01772155

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Keywords

  • Protein Concentration
  • Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate
  • Specific Gravity
  • Hemoglobin Concentration
  • Leukocyte Count