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Primates

, Volume 15, Issue 2–3, pp 141–149 | Cite as

Regressive periods in primate behavioral development with reference to other mammals

  • Robert H. Horwich
Article

Abstract

Studies on behavioral development in 12 species of monkeys indicate normal fluctuations of high frequency of nipple contact. These periods decrease in intensity as the infant develops and occur at similar times in development in the 12 species. Literature on 11 species of primates and three species of non-primates indicates similar regressions in mother-infant contact, which implies a common genetic basis for the phenomenon.

Keywords

Genetic Basis Animal Ecology Similar Time Behavioral Development Similar Regression 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Japan Monkey Centre 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert H. Horwich
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Chicago Zoological SocietyUSA
  2. 2.Institute of Micro-ontogenetic Ethology and Macro-cosmological EcolgyLa Grange ParkUSA

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