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Klinische Wochenschrift

, Volume 62, Issue 4, pp 187–189 | Cite as

Serum ceruloplasmin and copper levels in patients with primary brain tumors

  • L. Turecký
  • P. Kalina
  • E. Uhlíková
  • Š. Námerová
  • J. Križko
Wissenschaftliche Kurzmitteilungen

Summary

Serum copper and ceruloplasmin levels are known to increase in several malignancies such as osteosarcomas, some gastrointestinal tumors, and lung cancer. In this study serum copper and ceruloplasmin levels in 40 patients with primary brain tumors were studied. Both parameters were increased in sera of patients with tumors in comparison with healthy subjects or patients with non-tumorous neurological diseases. It is concluded that copper and ceruloplasmin represent a good complement to some other nonspecific parameters in evaluating the activity of malignancy and the therapeutic results.

Key words

Primary brain tumor Copper Ceruloplasmin 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. Turecký
  • P. Kalina
  • E. Uhlíková
  • Š. Námerová
  • J. Križko

There are no affiliations available

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