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Public Choice

, Volume 25, Issue 1, pp 95–99 | Cite as

Book reviews

  • David G. Davies
  • Gordon Tullock
Article
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References

  1. 1.
    For an excellent example of the interweaving of theory and date regarding the growth in government see Thomas E. Borcherding, “The Sources of Growth of Public Expenditures, 1902–1970,” and “One Hundred Years of Public Spending, 1870–1970,” in Thomas E. Borcherding and Winston C. Bush (eds.)Budgets and Bureaucrats: The Origins of Government Growth, Durham, Duke University Press, forthcoming.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    James M. Buchanan, “Why does Government Grow?”,ibid.Google Scholar
  3. 1a.
    See, Gordon Tullock, “Biological Externalities”,Journal of Theoretical Biology, XXXIII (December, 1971), 565–76; “Switching in General Predators: A Comment,”Bulletin of the Ecological Society of America, LXI (March, 1971), 218–19; and “The Coal Tit as a Careful Shopper,”The American Naturalist, CV (January–February, 1971), 77–80.Google Scholar
  4. 2a.
    “Coordination Without Command” (mimeographed).Google Scholar
  5. 3.
    The Insect Societies (Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1971).Google Scholar
  6. 4.
    Trivers offers a definition: “An altruistic act can be defined as one that harms the organism performing the act while benefiting some other individual, harm and benefit being defined in terms of reproductive success. Since any gene that helps itself spread in a population is, by definition, being selected for, altruistic behavior in the above sense can be selected only if there is a sufficiently large probability that the recipient of the act also has the gene. More precisely, the benefit/cost ratio of the act, times the chance that the recipient has the gene, must be greater than one. [Robert L. Trivers, “Parent-Offspring Conflict,”The American Zoologist, XIV (no. 1, 1974), 250.]Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Center for Study of Public Choice Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • David G. Davies
    • 1
  • Gordon Tullock
    • 2
  1. 1.Duke UniversityUSA
  2. 2.Center for Study of Public Choice Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State UniversityUSA

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