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Bioaccumulation of mercury and its effect on protein metabolism of the water hyacinth weevilNeochetina eichhornae (Warner)

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Correspondence to Kaiser Jamil.

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Hussain, M.S., Jamil, K. Bioaccumulation of mercury and its effect on protein metabolism of the water hyacinth weevilNeochetina eichhornae (Warner). Bull. Environ. Contam. Toxicol. 45, 294–298 (1990). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01700198

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Keywords

  • Waste Water
  • Mercury
  • Water Management
  • Water Pollution
  • Bioaccumulation