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Attraction increases and decreases as a function of emotion-attribution and appropriate social cues

Abstract

To study the impact of startle-induced arousal on attraction, blindfolded subjects in a “vestibular function” study were startled by a loud noise accompanying the sudden backward tilt of the dental chair in which they were seated. In Study I, startled male subjects indicated (on a “postexperimental” questionnaire) greater attraction toward a pretty female experimenter than did control subjects. Study II demonstrated the reverse, with startled male subjects disliking a male experimenter more than controls. In Study III, female subjects startled by a male experimenter indicated greater attraction than controls, although the pattern of their responses differed from males. While an attempt to induce misattribution of arousal to a (placebo) pill (Study IV) or to a noise (Study V) with “arousal” side effects resulted in negligible attenuation effects on the startle—attraction relationship, in Study VI the imposition of a delay period between startle and experimenter ratings resulted in reduced ratings of attraction. The role of arousal in romantic attraction is briefly discussed, and the relevance of these data to theories of emotion is considered.

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Correspondence to Richard A. Dienstbier.

Additional information

This research was supported by a grant from the Research Council of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. The author wishes to thank Virginia Broady, Steve Slane, Nancy Kahn, Kathy Orr, and Cindy Smith, who acted as the researchers for Studies I, II and III, IV, V, and VI, respectively.

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Dienstbier, R.A. Attraction increases and decreases as a function of emotion-attribution and appropriate social cues. Motiv Emot 3, 201–218 (1979). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01650604

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Keywords

  • Placebo
  • Experimenter Rating
  • Male Subject
  • Female Subject
  • Delay Period