Dermabrasion of the skin: Prevention and/or treatment of hyperpigmentation

Abstract

Dermabrasion of the face for multiple conditions requiring reconstructive surgery is still a valuable tool for the plastic and reconstructive surgeon. This article deals specifically with one of the most important complications, namely, hyperpigmentation.

The specific effect of estrogens on hyperpigmentation and the manner of dealing with it by the use of hydroquinone ointment are discussed. Illustrative case histories and photographs are shown. The reversal of the hyperpigmentation caused by estrogens and treated by hydroquinone ointment are explained, and the conclusion is reached that this management leads to permanent satisfactory results.

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Correspondence to Joseph A. Ferreira M.D..

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Ferreira, J.A. Dermabrasion of the skin: Prevention and/or treatment of hyperpigmentation. Aesth. Plast. Surg. 1, 381–389 (1976). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01570273

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Key Words

  • Dermabrasion
  • hyperpigmentation
  • estrogens