Psychiatric Quarterly

, Volume 35, Issue 2, pp 306–313

Celiac syndrome in the case histories of five schizophrenics

  • Harold Graff
  • Allen Handford
Article

Summary and Conclusions

Celiac syndrome in infancy was encountered in the case histories of five young adults diagnosed as having schizophrenia. A review of the literature reveals no previous report linking celiac syndrome and schizophrenia. Other similarities of the five cases were discussed. Speculation as to the psychic and biochemical relationship between celiac syndrome and schizopherenia suggests a basis for additional research.

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Copyright information

© The Psychiatric Quarterly 1961

Authors and Affiliations

  • Harold Graff
    • 1
  • Allen Handford
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Pennsylvania HospitalPhiladelphia 39

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