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Mentoring, job satisfaction, gender, and the legal profession

Abstract

We examine the prevalence of mentoring among lawyers and the effect mentoring has on their employment situations, with special attention to gender differences. The data come from a 1989 cross-sectional survey of 1132 Georgia lawyers (80% white and 18% black). No significant difference in having mentors was found across racial categories. Results initially show female lawyers are more likely than males to have mentors, but this is due to gender differences in type of law practice and position in them; among associate-level lawyers in law firms there is no gender difference in having a mentor. Having a mentor improves lawyers' job satisfaction; and the size of this benefit is the same for both sexes.

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Mobley, G.M., Jaret, C., Marsh, K. et al. Mentoring, job satisfaction, gender, and the legal profession. Sex Roles 31, 79–98 (1994). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01560278

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01560278

Keywords

  • Gender Difference
  • Social Psychology
  • Effect Mentor
  • Racial Category
  • Legal Profession