Construction and validation of the Gender Attitude Inventory, a structured inventory to assess multiple dimensions of gender attitudes

Abstract

Three studies describe the development and initial validation of the Gender Attitude Inventory (GAI), a structured inventory that assesses attitudes toward the multiple objects that organize college students' thoughts and feelings about sex and gender. An intergroup relations perspective was used to specify the universe of gender-related targets and to construct a preliminary instrument. Factor analyses of the results of two sequential studies yielded a 109-item inventory with 14 content-specific attitude areas and three second-order factors. In Study 3 GAI scales were shown to have acceptable internal consistency and temporal stability, as well as convergent and discriminant validity. In terms of race/ethnicity, most respondents were white (ranging from 69% to 82% across the three studies).

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Correspondence to Richard D. Ashmore.

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Ashmore, R.D., Del Boca, F.K. & Bilder, S.M. Construction and validation of the Gender Attitude Inventory, a structured inventory to assess multiple dimensions of gender attitudes. Sex Roles 32, 753–785 (1995). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01560188

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Keywords

  • Internal Consistency
  • College Student
  • Social Psychology
  • Discriminant Validity
  • Temporal Stability