Typology of male-to-female transsexualism

Abstract

This study tested a prediction derived from the hypothesis that asexual and bisexual transsexualism are actually subtypes of heterosexual transsexualism. Two questionnaire scales measuring erotic attraction to males and females were administered to 163 male-to-female transsexuals. A cluster analysis of their scores divided the subjects into four groups: heterosexual, homosexual, bisexual, and asexual. Fisher Exact tests were used to compare the frequency with which subjects in the four clusters reported a history of erotic arousal in association with cross-dressing. As predicted, there were no differences among the asexual, bisexual, and heterosexual transsexuals, and all three groups included a much higher proportion of fetishistic cases than the homosexual group (p ≤.0001, two-tailed). These findings support the view that male transsexuals may be divided into two basic types: heterosexual and homosexual.

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Blanchard, R. Typology of male-to-female transsexualism. Arch Sex Behav 14, 247–261 (1985). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01542107

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Key words

  • transsexualism
  • transvestism
  • gender disorders
  • fetishism