Journal of Family Violence

, Volume 9, Issue 3, pp 195–225 | Cite as

Continuities in marital violence

  • Sharon Woffordt
  • Delbert Elliott Mihalic
  • Scott Menard
Article

Abstract

Marital violence studies of clinical populations of battered women indicate that, over time, violence becomes an habitual strategy for resolving conflicts resulting in escalation in frequency and severity of violence. This study examines the issue of continuity of marital violence among a national probability sample of female victims and male offenders. Findings indicate that among the general population, approximately one-half of all marital violence is suspended over a three-year period. Predictors of marital violence continuity were also investigated in an exploratory way.

Key words

violence abuse continuity marital 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sharon Woffordt
    • 1
  • Delbert Elliott Mihalic
    • 1
  • Scott Menard
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Behavioral ScienceUniversity of Colorado at BoulderBoulder
  2. 2.School of Criminal JusticeState University of New York, at AlbanyAlbany

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