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Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 16, Issue 3, pp 295–316 | Cite as

Ontogeny of communicative functions in autism

  • Amy Miller Wetherby
Article

Abstract

Autistic children have been stereotyped as noncommunicative and noninteractive; however, this may be partly attributed to traditional research approaches that do not consider the intentions of the child or the context of the social interaction. This discussion reviews some recent investigations that have used a developmental pragmatics framework to study language and communicative behaviors associated with autism. A working model of the ontogeny of communicative functions in autistic children is proposed. The communicative profile associated with autism is explained by factors related to the child's language-learning environment, as well as factors inherent in the child. Clinical implications for the design of language intervention programs for autistic children are offered.

Keywords

Social Interaction Intervention Program Clinical Implication Research Approach Autistic Child 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Amy Miller Wetherby
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Communication DisordersFlorida State UniversityTallahassee

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