Dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DBH) and homovanillic acid (HVA) in autistic children

  • C. Garnier
  • E. Comoy
  • C. Barthelemy
  • I. Leddet
  • B. Garreau
  • J. P. Muh
  • G. Lelord

Abstract

In the present study, plasma DBH activity and urinary HVA levels were measured in 19 autistic and 15 normal children. DBH activity was significantly elevated in the 8 less retarded autistic patients. In this subgroup, a negative correlation was found between plasma DBH and urinary HVA levels. These results support the hypothesis of a possible involvement of brain catecholamine dysfunction in the production of autistic symptoms.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. American Psychiatric Association. (1980).Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (DSM-III) (3rd. ed.). Washington, DC: Author.Google Scholar
  2. Belmaker, R. H., Hattab, J., & Ebstein, R. P. (1978). Plasma dopamine-β-hydroxylase in childhood psychosis.Journal of Autism and Childhood Schizophrenia, 8, 293–298.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Campbell, M., Anderson, L. T., Small, A. M., Perry, R., Green, W. H., & Caplan, R. (1982). The effects of haloperidol on learning and behavior in autistic children.Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 12, 167–175.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Cohen, D. J., Caparulo, B. K., Shaywitz, B. A., & Bower, M. B., Jr. (1977). Dopamine and serotonin metabolism in neuropsychiatrically disturbed children: CSF homovanillic acid and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid.Archives of General Psychiatry, 34, 545–550.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. Coleman, M., Campbell, M., Freedman, L. S., Roffman, M., Ebstein, R. P., & Goldstein, M. (1974). Serum dopamine-beta-hydroxylase levels in Down's syndrome.Clinical Genetics, 5, 312–315.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. Elchisak, M. A., Polinsky, R. J., Ebert, M. M., Powers, K. J., & Kopin, I. J. (1978). Contribution of plasma homovanillic acid (HVA) to urine and cerebrospinal fluid HVA in the monkey and its pharmacokinetic disposition.Life Sciences, 23, 2339–2348.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. Garreau, B., Barthelemy, C., Domenech, J., Sauvage, D., Muh, J. P., Lelord, G., & Callaway, E. (1980). Troubles du métabolisme de la dopamine chez des enfants ayant un comportement autistique. Résultats des examens cliniques et des dosages urinaires de l'acide homovanilique.Acta Psychiatrica Belgica, 80, 249–265.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. Goldstein, M. (1976). DBH and endogenous total 5-hydroxyindole levels in autistic patients and controls. In M. Coleman (Ed.),The autistic syndrome (pp. 57–58). Amsterdam: North-Holland.Google Scholar
  9. Kato, T., Kusuya, H., & Nagatsu, T. (1974). A simple and sensitive assay for dopamine betahydroxylase activity by dual-wavelength spectrophotometry.Biochemical Medicine, 10, 320–328.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. Kopin, I. J., Kaufman, S., Viveros, H., Jacobowitz, D., Lake, R., Ziegler, M. G., Lovenberg, W., & Goodwin, F. K. (1976). Dopamine beta-hydroxylase.Basic and Clinical Studies: Annals of Internal Medicine, 85, 211–223.Google Scholar
  11. Lake, C. R., Ziegler, M. G., & Murphy, D. L. (1977). Increased norepinephrine levels and decreasedβ-hydroxylase activity in primary autism.Archives of General Psychiatry, 34, 553–556.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  12. Lelord, G., Callaway, E., Muh, J. P., Sauvage, D., & Arlot, J. C. (1978). L'acide homovanilique urinaire et ses modifications par ingestion de vitamine B6: Exploration fonctionnelle dans l'autisme de l'enfant?Revue Neurologique, 134, 797–801.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  13. Lelord, G., Muh, J. P., Barthelemy, C., Martineau, J., Garreau, B., & Callaway, E. (1981). Effects of pyridoxine and magnesium on autistic symptoms. Initial observations.Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 11, 219–230.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  14. Maas, J. W., Hattox, S. E., Greene, N. M., & Landis, D. H. (1979). 3-Methoxy-4-hydroxy-phenethyleneglycol production by human brain in vivo.Science, 205, 1025–1027.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  15. Peyrin, L., Simon, H., Cottet-Eymard, J. M., Bruneau, N., & LeMoal, M. (1982). 6-Hydroxydopamine lesions of dopaminergic A10 neurons. Long-term effects on the urinary excretion of free and conjugated catecholamines and their metabolites in the rat.Brain Research, 235, 363–369.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  16. Roginsky, M. S., Gordon, R. D., & Bennett, M. J. (1974). A rapid and simple gas-liquid Chromatographic procedure for homovanillic and vanillylmandelic acid in urine.Clinica Chimica Acta, 56, 261–264.Google Scholar
  17. Wadman, S. K., Ketting, D., & Voute, P. A. (1976). Gas Chromatographic determination of urinary vanilglycol acid, vanilglycol, vanilacetic acid, and vanilactic acid. Chemical parameters for the diagnosis of neurogenic tumours and the evaluations of their treatment.Clinica Chimica Acta, 72, 49–68.Google Scholar
  18. Young, J. G., Cohen, D. J., Brown, S. L., & Caparulo, B. K. (1978). Decreased urinary free catecholamines in childhood autism.Journal of the American Academy of Child Psychiatry, 17, 671–678.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  19. Young, J. G., Cohen, D. J., Caparulo, B. K., Brown, S. L., & Maas, J. W. (1979). Decreased 24-hour urinary MHPG in childhood autism.American Journal of Psychiatry, 136, 1055–1057.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  20. Young, J. G., Cohen, D. J., Kavanagh, M. E., Landis, H. D., Shaywitz, B. A., & Maas, J. W. (1981). Cerebrospinal fluid, plasma and urinary MHPG in children.Life Sciences, 28, 2837–2845.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  21. Young, J. G., Cohen, D. J., Shaywitz, S. E., Caparulo, R. K., Kavanagh, M. E., Hunt, R. D., Leckman, J. P., Anderson, G. M., Detlor, J., Harcherik, D., & Shaywitz, B. A. (1982). Assessment of brain function in clinical pediatric research: Behavioral and biological strategies.Schizophrenia Bulletin, 8(2), 205–235.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  22. Young, J. G., Kavanagh, M. E., Anderson, G. M., Shaywitz, B. A., & Cohen, D. J. (1982). Clinical neurochemistry of autism and associated disorders.Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 12, 147–165.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  23. Young, J. G., Kyprie, R. M., Ross, N. T., & Cohen, D. J. (1980). Serum dopamine-beta-hydroxylase activity: Clinical applications in child psychiatry.Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 10, 1–14.PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Garnier
    • 1
  • E. Comoy
    • 2
  • C. Barthelemy
    • 1
  • I. Leddet
    • 1
  • B. Garreau
    • 1
  • J. P. Muh
    • 1
  • G. Lelord
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratoire de Neurophysiologie et de Thérapeutique en PédopsychiatrieC. H. U. BretonneauToursFrance
  2. 2.Unité de Biologie CliniqueInstitut Gustave RoussyFrance

Personalised recommendations