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Child Psychiatry and Human Development

, Volume 7, Issue 2, pp 67–84 | Cite as

The well-baby clinic

  • W. Ernest Freud
  • Irene Freud
Articles

Abstract

The termwell-baby clinic (literally, a clinic that concerns itself with healthy infants) is probably better known in the United States, where such clinics exist, than in central Europe, where, on the whole, they do not. For the convenience of readers accustomed to it a formal definition is proffered: A “well-baby clinic” is a service center, with emphasis on physical and mental hygiene and prophylaxis, where mothers are seen with their young, healthy infants and helped to understand and manage the infant's unfolding maturation [1: p. 5] and development [1: p. 5]. This may serve to differentiate well-baby clinics, on the one hand, from clinics for sick children and child guidance clinics (usually resorted to after disturbances have emerged) and, on the other hand, from maternity and child welfare clinics, whose primary object is to safeguard physical health. (Maternity and child welfare clinics are also known as “family health clinics,” “child health clinics,” and “infant welfare clinics.” The extent to which they can cater to the psychological needs of mother and infant depends on their staff's training.)

Keywords

Social Psychology Physical Health Child Health Primary Object Health Clinic 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. Ernest Freud
    • 1
  • Irene Freud
    • 1
  1. 1.Hampstead Child-Therapy ClinicLondon

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