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Hirschman's loyalty: Attitude or behavior?

Abstract

Over the past two decades there has been much controversy over what Hirschman intended by the term “loyalty” in his bookExit, Voice, and Loyalty. Some have interpreted Hirschman's loyalty as an attitude that deters exit and promotes voice. Others have interpreted Hirschman's loyalty as a distinct behavior, like exit and voice, that results from dissatisfaction. This article examines both views of loyalty simultaneously. First, comprehensive and reliable scales to measure the behavioral responses to dissatisfaction are developed. Second, the relationship between loyalty and the behavioral responses to dissatisfaction are examined. Results of this research indicate that both interpretations are important and together help us better understand how employees behave when they are dissatisfied.

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Leck, J.D., Saunders, D.M. Hirschman's loyalty: Attitude or behavior?. Employ Respons Rights J 5, 219–230 (1992). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01385049

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01385049

Key Words

  • employees and responses to dissatisfaction
  • models of dissatisfaction
  • exit
  • voice
  • loyalty
  • neglect
  • signals of organizational decline