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Higher Education

, Volume 27, Issue 1, pp 1–40 | Cite as

The state and the liberal universities in South Africa: 1948–1990

  • Graeme C. Moodie
Article

Abstract

Only the liberal (or “open”) universities in South Africa publicly opposed the National Government and itsapartheid policies, but for the most part only over issues of university and, later, academic freedom. The history of the period is not simply one of conflict between state and universities, however. It is also one of co-operation in, for example, a programme of state-financed university expansion (from which all “races” benefited). This article explores the bases for both conflict and co-operation. These include a degree of government respect for higher education and, on the other hand, the availability to the universities of certain political resources. The universities came under considerable pressure from a repressive government, but the story is not a simple one of good against evil or freedom against totalitarianism. It is both more complex and (in my view) more interesting.

Keywords

High Education Academic Freedom Considerable Pressure Political Resource Government Respect 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Graeme C. Moodie
    • 1
  1. 1.Emeritus Professor of PoliticsUniversity of YorkEngland

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