Journal of behavioral assessment

, Volume 1, Issue 2, pp 123–132 | Cite as

Development and validation of the Eating Behavior Inventory

  • Patrick Mahlen O'Neil
  • Hal S. Currey
  • Amy A. Hirsch
  • Robert J. Malcolm
  • James D. Sexauer
  • F. Elizabeth Riddle
  • C. Inga Taylor
Article

Abstract

The Eating Behavior Inventory (EBI) is a self-report instrument for assessing behaviors that have been theoretically implicated in weight loss, e.g., self-monitoring of food intake and of weight, refusing offers of food, eating at only one place, shopping from a list, eating in response to emotions. Thirty items were constructed in the form of first-person statements, e.g., “I eat in the middle of the night.” Each item was to be rated with a 5-point scale according to how often it was true for the respondent. Items were scored such that higher scores always reflected more “appropriate” (theoretically facilitative of weight control) eating patterns. Validity of individual items and total score was assessed in four studies. Twenty-six of the original items appeared valid and were retained. The resulting total score demonstrated validity in these studies and in two cross-validational comparisons. Internal consistency as measured by split-half reliability and correlations of item scores with total score was acceptable. One month test-retest reliability of item and total scores was satisfactory. Clinical and research applications of the EBI are discussed.

Key words

Eating Behavior Inventory obesity weight control 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Ferguson, J. M.Learning to Eat: Behavior Modification for Weight Control. Palo Alto, Calif.: Bull Publishing Co., 1975.Google Scholar
  2. Ferguson, J. M.Habits, Not Diets: The Real Way to Weight Control. Palo Alto, Calif.: Bull Publishing Co., 1976.Google Scholar
  3. Mahoney, M. J. The obese eating style: Bites, beliefs, and behavior modification.Addictive Behaviors, 1975,1, 47–53.Google Scholar
  4. Malcolm, R., Riddle, E., Currey, H. S., & Sexauer, J. D. Behavior modification in the management of obesity.South Carolina Medical Journal. 1977,73, 197–199.Google Scholar
  5. O'Neil, P. M., Currey, H. S., Hirsch, A. A., Riddle, F. E., Taylor, C. I., Malcolm, R. J., & Sexauer, J. D. Effects of sex of subject and spouse involvement on weight loss in a behavioral treatment program: A retrospective investigation.Addictive Behaviors, 1979,4, 167–177.Google Scholar
  6. Plutchik, R. Emotions and attitudes related to being overweight.Journal of Clinical Psychology, 1976,32, 21–24.Google Scholar
  7. Stuart, R. B., & Davis, B.Slim Chance in a Fat World. Champaign, Ill.: Research Press, 1972.Google Scholar
  8. Wollersheim, J. P. Effectiveness of group therapy based upon learning principles in the treatment of overweight women.Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 1970,76, 462–474.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patrick Mahlen O'Neil
    • 1
    • 2
  • Hal S. Currey
    • 1
  • Amy A. Hirsch
    • 1
  • Robert J. Malcolm
    • 1
  • James D. Sexauer
    • 1
    • 2
  • F. Elizabeth Riddle
    • 1
  • C. Inga Taylor
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesMedical University of South CarolinaCharleston
  2. 2.the Veterans Administration HospitalCharleston

Personalised recommendations