Mesopelagic-boundary community in Hawaii: Micronekton at the interface between neritic and oceanic ecosystems

Abstract

The present study demonstrates that a distinct land-associated community of mesopelagic micronekton exists around the Hawaiian Islands. This “mesopelagic-boundary community” replaces the oceanic mesopelagic community over bottom depths of approx 400 to 700 m and includes about 14 species of fishes, 5 of shrimps and 4 of squids. Similar species of the mesopelagic micronekton have been reported in association with other landmasses at the boundary between the oceanic mesopelagic realm and upper continental or island slopes. These species may form a cosmopolitan “mesopelagic-boundary community” which shows regional differences in taxonomic composition, abundance and diversity. Boundary communities, with populations which are both tightly constrained geographically and relatively accessible to shore-based research programs, offer unique opportunities for studying biological processes of the mesopelagic realm and the interactions between neritic and oceanic populations. Data is presented from three midwater and two neuston sampling projects undertaken around the main Hawaiian Islands between 1987 and 1989; additional evidence from the literature is also discussed.

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Communicated by M.G. Hadfield, Honolulu

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Reid, S.B., Hirota, J., Young, R.E. et al. Mesopelagic-boundary community in Hawaii: Micronekton at the interface between neritic and oceanic ecosystems. Mar. Biol. 109, 427–440 (1991). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01313508

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Keywords

  • Biological Process
  • Research Program
  • Regional Difference
  • Taxonomic Composition
  • Similar Species