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Zeitschrift für Physik A Hadrons and Nuclei

, Volume 352, Issue 2, pp 117–118 | Cite as

High spin band structures in104Cd

  • W. Klamra
  • E. Adamides
  • A. Atac
  • R. A. Bark
  • B. Cederwall
  • C. Fahlander
  • B. Fogelberg
  • A. Gizon
  • J. Gizon
  • H. Grawe
  • E. Ideguchi
  • D. Jerrestam
  • A. Johnson
  • R. Julin
  • S. Juutinen
  • W. Kaczmarczyk
  • A. Kerek
  • J. Kownacki
  • S. Mitarai
  • L. O. Norlin
  • J. Nyberg
  • M. Piiparinen
  • R. Schubart
  • D. Seweryniak
  • G. Sletten
  • S. Törmänen
  • A. Virtanen
  • R. Wyss
Short Note

Abstract

High spin states in104Cd have been investigated by means of heavy ion induced reactions using the Nordball detector array. The level scheme constructed from γγ-coincidences is dominated by three band structures. The positive parity band shows no rotational like energy spacing. It is thus understood mostly in terms of quasiparticle excitations with vd5/2, vg7/2 andπg9/2 configurations. The collective properties of the negative parity bands are more pronounced. These bands are most likely due to v(h11/2,d5/2) and v(h11/2,g7/2) structures.

Keywords

Band Structure High Spin Spin State Detector Array Positive Parity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. Klamra
    • 1
  • E. Adamides
    • 2
  • A. Atac
    • 3
  • R. A. Bark
    • 4
  • B. Cederwall
    • 1
  • C. Fahlander
    • 3
  • B. Fogelberg
    • 5
  • A. Gizon
    • 6
  • J. Gizon
    • 6
  • H. Grawe
    • 7
  • E. Ideguchi
    • 8
  • D. Jerrestam
    • 5
  • A. Johnson
    • 1
  • R. Julin
    • 9
  • S. Juutinen
    • 9
  • W. Kaczmarczyk
    • 10
  • A. Kerek
    • 1
  • J. Kownacki
    • 10
  • S. Mitarai
    • 8
  • L. O. Norlin
    • 1
  • J. Nyberg
    • 3
  • M. Piiparinen
    • 9
  • R. Schubart
    • 7
  • D. Seweryniak
    • 9
  • G. Sletten
    • 4
  • S. Törmänen
    • 9
  • A. Virtanen
    • 9
  • R. Wyss
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhysicsThe Royal Institute of TechnologyStockholmSweden
  2. 2.National Center for Scientific ResearchAr. ParaskeviGreece
  3. 3.The Svedberg LaboratoryUniversity of UppsalaUppsalaSweden
  4. 4.Niels Bohr Institute RisøRoskildeDenmark
  5. 5.Department of Neutron ResearchUniversity of UppsalaStudsvikSweden
  6. 6.Institut des Sciences NucléairesGrenobleFrance
  7. 7.Hahn-Meitner InstituteBerlinGermany
  8. 8.Department of Physics, Faculty of ScienceKyushu UniversityFukuokaJapan
  9. 9.Department of PhysicsUniversity of JyväskyläJyväskyläFinland
  10. 10.Heavy Ion LaboratoryUniversity of WarsawWarsawPoland

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